Dracula was translated into Icelandic in 1901, and it wasn’t until 2014 that anyone noticed this version was actually a significantly different novel with a smaller page count and a lot more sex

Dracula

This article is about the novel. For the character, see Count Dracula. For other uses, see Dracula (disambiguation).

Dracula is an 1897 Gothic horror novel by Irish author Bram Stoker. It introduced the character of Count Dracula and established many conventions of subsequent vampire fantasy. The novel tells the story of Dracula’s attempt to move from Transylvania to England so that he may find new blood and spread the undead curse, and of the battle between Dracula and a small group of people led by Professor Abraham Van Helsing.

Dracula has been assigned to many literary genres including vampire literature, horror fiction, gothic fiction, and invasion literature. The novel has spawned numerous theatrical, film, and television inte… Continue Reading (24 minute read)

9 thoughts on “Dracula was translated into Icelandic in 1901, and it wasn’t until 2014 that anyone noticed this version was actually a significantly different novel with a smaller page count and a lot more sex”

  1. WordplayWizard

    Putting the D back in Dracula, since 1901.

  2. KeyVardy

    Follow-up: if you watch a porno version of Dracula you are actually watching a faithful adaptation for the Icelandic market

  3. Sculo

    I bet this was only discovered when an Icelandic person showed up to a Halloween party in America dressed as “dracula” wearing assless chaps and a ball gag

  4. HolyMolyitsMichael

    Imagine them seeing all the american versions of dracula movies and being like “this is nothing like the book at all!”

  5. livinginfutureworld

    Why were the versions different?

    >De Roos has argued that the differences between the English original of Dracula and the Icelandic version were not due to changes made by Ásmundsson, but rather that he was using a different, older manuscript of Dracula provided to him by Stoker, which the latter had discarded for the English version.[75] De Roos has argued that some aspects of Makt Myrkranna were due to Ásmundsson and other aspects were parts of Dracula that Stoker had removed due to concerns about government censorship.[76]

  6. DownvoteEvangelist

    Wonder how common is this.

  7. twitch_delta_blues

    Vlad the Impaler

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