Our brains do not necessarily process everything as that would be an overload of information, a study from 2016 found that under the influence of LSD, the brain recruited many more regions for visual processing than normal, enriching the images people saw even when their eyes were shut.

Study shows how LSD interferes with brain’s signalling

A group of volunteers who took a trip in the name of science have helped researchers uncover how LSD messes with activity in the brain to induce an altered state of consciousness.

Brain scans of individuals high on the drug revealed that the chemical allows parts of the cortex to become flooded with signals that are normally filtered out to prevent information overload.

The drug allowed more information to flow from the thalamus, a kind of neural gatekeeper, to a region called the posterior cingulate cortex, and it stemmed the flow of information to another part known as the temporal cortex.

This disruption in communication may underpin some of the wacky effects reported by LSD users, from feelings of bliss and being at one with… Continue Reading (4 minute read)

10 thoughts on “Our brains do not necessarily process everything as that would be an overload of information, a study from 2016 found that under the influence of LSD, the brain recruited many more regions for visual processing than normal, enriching the images people saw even when their eyes were shut.”

  1. aupri

    On low doses of psychedelics I always get HD vision. It’s like I can see more of my visual field with high acuity rather than just having a small focal point in the center. On higher doses the waviness makes it harder to make things out

  2. DoorAndRat

    One time I was coming down from acid watching an episode of 30 Rock and I could see the layers of video editing clear as day. Main characters were on a saturated layer while the background was a little duller. It was really cool.

  3. keetojm

    The brain “not processing” everything is obvious. It has learned to it respond to things all around us. Just think about the amount of contact your skin has with so many things all around you. And yet, your brain acts like it didn’t process that info. To be honest, it processed everything, but knows what info to let through to respond to.

  4. Throwaaawaayyy123456

    I wonder how this works for people with Sensory Processing Disorder.

  5. isnortshrooms

    Anyone else ever try and focus on all sensations at once? Really good for helping calm you down and also gets you tripping balls if your on drugs

  6. liquid_at

    I’ve heard that description a lot of times when it comes to LSD. That it deactivates, or at least blocks the filter, allowing you to literally see things you wouldn’t see otherwise.

    Imho, that’s the reason hallucinogens have the therapeutic effects attributed to them.

    The worst thing about LSD is that people consider it to be a party-drug, when it isn’t.

  7. TheRedmanCometh

    For sure. The only time I got a nuke in mw2 I was on a half hit of acid…got that nuke in deathmatch. That entire night I won every game but one by absurd margins.

    I’m not usually good at fps games

  8. TacTurtle

    What happens when a blind person takes LSD?

  9. homeherenow99

    IIRC Aldous Huxley described the brain as a “reducing valve” and that taking psychedelics opens up that valve. If you’re interested he talks about his experiences in ‘The Doors of Perception’

  10. Big_D_Cyrus

    As someone who has done LSD on many occasions I can confirm this is true.

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