In an experiment that trained rats to drive tiny cars by giving treats as a reward, rats ended up loving driving so much they’d do it without a reward

Rats love driving tiny cars, even when they don’t get treats

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Rats that learn to drive are more able to cope with stress. That might sound like the fever-dream of a former scientist-turned-car writer, but it’s actually one of the results of a new study from the University of Richmond. The aim of the research was to see what effect the environment a rat was raised in had on its ability to learn new tasks. Although that kind of thing has been studied in the past, the tests haven’t been particularly complicated. Anyone who has spent time around rats will know they’re actually quite resourceful. So the team, led by Professor Kelly Lambert, came up this time with something a little more involved than navigating a maze: driving.

If you’re going to teach rats to drive, first … Continue Reading (3 minute read)

7 thoughts on “In an experiment that trained rats to drive tiny cars by giving treats as a reward, rats ended up loving driving so much they’d do it without a reward”

  1. divlji_zumbul

    I read about this and if I remember correctly, the rats who were passengers experience a lot of stress, compared to the drivers, who loved it

  2. queer_b8

    Train a mouse to drive, he’ll love it for an experiment

    Give a mouse a motorcycle, he’ll hit the open road for life

  3. IRateClouds

    >Rats that learn to drive are more able to cope with stress. That might sound like the fever-dream of a former scientist-turned-car writer, but it’s actually one of the results of a new study from the University of Richmond. The aim of the research was to see what effect the environment a rat was raised in had on its ability to learn new tasks. Although that kind of thing has been studied in the past, the tests haven’t been particularly complicated. Anyone who has spent time around rats will know they’re actually quite resourceful. So the team, led by Professor Kelly Lambert, came up this time with something a little more involved than navigating a maze: driving.

    That is simply incredible.

  4. LennyZakatek

    Neither the mouse nor the boy was the least bit surprised that each could understand the other. Two creatures who shared a love for motorcycles naturally spoke the same language.

    *pb-pb-b-bb pb-p-b-b-b-b-b*

  5. mrgumble

    WHY ARE THERE NO VIDEOS OF RATS DRIVING TINY CARS???

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