In the 90s, video game designer Kenji Eno learned he had blind fans, who played his games with great effort. So he designed a blank-screen game just for them: “Real Sound: Kaze no Regret.” He made Sega send 1000 consoles (w/ the game) to blind people. It is still a popular game for the blind.

Real Sound: Kaze no Regret

“Real Sound” redirects here. For a technology for the PC, see RealSound.

Real Sound: Kaze no Regret (リアルサウンド ~風のリグレット~, Riaru Saundo ~ Kaze no Riguretto) is an adventure audio game developed by Warp and published by Sega. The game was first released for the Saturn in July 1997, and later for the Dreamcast in March 1999. Real Sound was intended to provide equal access to sighted and blind players.

Development

Warp’s president, Kenji Eno, created the game after receiving numerous appreciation letters from blind fans of his games in Japan. Eno visited a number of his visually disabled fans to learn how it is that blind people could play the visually rich action game genre.

In a 2008 interview with 1Up, Eno stated:

I had a c… Continue Reading (4 minute read)

7 thoughts on “In the 90s, video game designer Kenji Eno learned he had blind fans, who played his games with great effort. So he designed a blank-screen game just for them: “Real Sound: Kaze no Regret.” He made Sega send 1000 consoles (w/ the game) to blind people. It is still a popular game for the blind.”

  1. howmuchbanana

    Couldn’t fit it all in the title:

    – The packaging was designed for fans to play without assistance from sighted people, including audio-only menus and physical instructions in braille

    – Eno actually wanted blind people to play with sighted friends. “I thought that if you turn off the monitor, both of you are just hearing the game. So after you finish the game, you can have an equal conversation about it with a blind person.”

    – The game is a choose-your-own-adventure type. A narrator tells the story, then chimes ring when it’s time for you to make a decision (using the controller).

    – The audio in the game was [recorded with binaural / Qsound technology](https://twitter.com/retro_ko/status/1348731737862414336) [EDITed for link], the same method now used for ASMR videos.

    – It’s only available in Japanese (as far as I know)

    alt. [SOURCE](https://twitter.com/AndrewElmore/status/1226261848766369792)

  2. GreenMagicCleaves

    I had a blind friend growing up who would play sonic the hedgehog. He could tell from the sounds whether he got hit, died, etc. I saw him when he first got the game and couldn’t understand why he played, several months later he could run green hill zone. Blew me away when I saw him beat the first robotnik.

  3. Lonk-the-Sane

    With the rise in popularity of visual novels in recent years, and the big jump in tech it would be awesome to see more games like this. No pun intended

  4. ImpSong

    There’s a whole community of blind videogamers out there. It’s interesting the different techniques they use to play different games and more games are becoming accessible to blind people these days.

  5. je97

    I was going to say how if it’s very popular with blind people to this day they’re keeping it a secret, because I’m active in the audiogaming community and I’ve never heard of it, but then I found out it’s only available in Japanese.

  6. Zeza86

    I remember seeing on youtube a couple years ago a blind kid playing (and finishing) The Legend of Zelda OoT. I wish Shigeru Myamoto could see that and develop a game for blind people. Imagine the possibilities.

  7. Nighthawk321

    Completely blind gamer here. That’s actually really interesting, something a little before my time. I have a [Twitch](https://www.twitch.tv/RossMinor00 and [Youtube](https://www.youtube.com/RossMinor) channel where I talk about how I play video games completely blind. I lost my sight due to a gunshot when I was 8 and I’ve always strived to continue playing video games, despite my blindness. It’s great to see information like this posted.

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