Vince Lombardi demanded “Nothing But Acceptance” from players and coaches toward all people, and he would immediately terminate a coach or release a player if that particular person insulted the sexual orientation of gay players and front office staff.

Vince Lombardi

One Packer famously said that Lombardi ‘treats us all the same – like dogs.’ To the coach, there were no gay dogs or straight dogs; there were just Packers who had one goal: to play their best and win.

—Jim Buzinski, Outsports.com co-founder

Lombardi was known to be volatile and terse with players during practices and games, and he insisted on unconditional respect for everyone in his organization. Lombardi demanded “Nothing But Acceptance” from players and coaches toward all people, and he would immediately terminate a coach or release a player if that particular person insulted the sexual orientation of gay players and front office staff.[failed verification] According to Lombardi biographer and Pulitzer Prize-winning writer … Continue Reading (9 minute read)

10 thoughts on “Vince Lombardi demanded “Nothing But Acceptance” from players and coaches toward all people, and he would immediately terminate a coach or release a player if that particular person insulted the sexual orientation of gay players and front office staff.”

  1. Choppergold

    He helped black players get adequate housing and warned Green Bay restaurant owners he’d boycott them if they refused to serve them too

  2. PrizeChemist

    This is what made Lombardi such an iconic leader. He was tuff, strict, “old school”, mean, and scary, yet he allowed himself to show his emotions to those around him. He loved, respected, and cared for his players. He was never afraid to cry in front of others and was progressive for his time. He felt things deeply and it showed. Basically, he was human.

    If you want to learn more about Lombardi, you should check out “When Pride Still Mattered” by David Maraniss. There is alot of football stuff in it, but there is so much to learn about leadership and life. Espesially if you are a leader or aspiring to be one.

  3. randomguild

    My mom worked at a flower shop in Rockville in the ’60s that Vince Lombardi would visit to play cards with the Italian guys that ran the place. He even tried to set her up with Sonny Jorgensen but she was a hippie and she literally didn’t care or know anything about football. She got a ton of merchandise from the Redskins that was signed by the team but it meant so little to her should that she just threw it all away.

  4. space_lyon

    Also threatened to publicly drag businesses through the mud if they stayed segregated. Lombardi would’ve taken a knee.

  5. calee1983

    Can confirm researched this entire subject in Fall 2018 for a digital humanities/american history hybrid class at the University of Wisconsin Green Bay that was about the first 50 years of Packers history and co taught by the director of the Packers HOF.

  6. LionKing729

    Makes me super happy the trophy is named after him

  7. nakedlettuce52

    Glad to be a Packers fan.

  8. dranowg

    Lombardi is a true football icon, one of the best (if not the best) coaches in NFL history but is without a doubt the best leader in NFL history

  9. Zombie-Chief

    “Lombardi was known to be volatile and terse with players during practices and games, and he insisted on unconditional respect for everyone in his organization.[144] Lombardi demanded “Nothing But Acceptance” from players and coaches toward all people, and he would immediately terminate a coach or release a player if that particular person insulted the sexual orientation of gay players and front office staff. [145][failed verification] According to Lombardi biographer and Pulitzer Prize-winning writer David Maraniss, if he caught a coach “discriminating against a player thought to be gay, he’d be fired.”[146] Richard Nicholls, the lifelong partner of Lombardi’s younger brother, Hal, stated, “Vin was always fair in how he treated everybody … a great man who accepted people at face value for what they were, and didn’t judge anybody. He just wanted you to do the job.””.

  10. TheKidNerd

    Also fun fact: this man lived to see segregation end, which must’ve made him absolutely smiling ear-to-ear

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