Some luxury buildings in New York City will only let you buy an appartment there after board approval. Mariah Carey was once rejected after showing up to the interview in a ‘bare midriff’ and answering “he be dead” when asked if Biggie would be visiting the building.

Celebrity Rejects

The San Remo: the super celeb-friendly building that has welcomed everyone from Bono to Bruce Willis, turned down Madonna in 1985. Photo: Wikimedia Commons

The San Remo: the super celeb-friendly building that has welcomed everyone from Bono to Bruce Willis, turned down Madonna in 1985. Photo: Wikimedia Commons

When Cameron Diaz decided to upgrade from a jewel box two-bedroom in the Village to a 3,000-square-foot spread at Walker Tower, she glided from a $9 million contract signing to closing with nary a hitch. Jon Bon Jovi, likewise, had no trouble at all getting into 150 Charles. Not surprising, of course, as both are condos, though Uma Thurman sailed right past the notoriously snobbish board of River House in 2013—famous for rejec… Continue Reading (8 minute read)

7 thoughts on “Some luxury buildings in New York City will only let you buy an appartment there after board approval. Mariah Carey was once rejected after showing up to the interview in a ‘bare midriff’ and answering “he be dead” when asked if Biggie would be visiting the building.”

  1. nim_opet

    It’s not just luxury, any ordinary coop can do that. They don’t even have to give you a reason for rejection.

  2. JonnyBravoII

    There is a co-op building near Carnegie Mellon in Pittsburgh. The first time Mr Rogers applied to buy an apartment, they rejected him. They didn’t want anyone in the building who was famous and could attract fans.

  3. Dog1234cat

    Nixon had to live in New Jersey because New York co-op boards wouldn’t approve him.

  4. bth807

    I once missed out on a place because the board felt bad for another applicant who was an Andrea Doria survivor.

  5. theulfberhtsword

    Most NYC apartments* very few condos in NYC and even they sometimes have an interview process.

    You also can’t buy most without at least 20% down even though banks are willing to finance with much lower rates.

    Most if not all renovations need to be then approved by the board.

  6. rblue

    But she’s not wrong. He be dead.

  7. mywrkact

    This is a totally normal part of coop ownership. I had to interview with the board, have multiple professional and personal references (I believe 6 letters total), and years upon years of tax returns… and I was buying my studio apartment all-cash.

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