For centuries the city of Troy was considered a myth until it was re-discovered in 1871 in present day Turkey. The area had been excavated before but the ruins of Troy were beneath newer excavations and had gone untouched for millennia even though the site had people living on top of it.

The search for the lost city of Troy

Exhibitions and events

The myth of the Trojan War has captivated people for thousands of years and has led pilgrims, explorers and archaeologists to search for the location where the famed conflict took place. But did the city really exist? In anticipation of our major autumn exhibition, curators Lesley Fitton and Alexandra Villing explore the reality behind the myth.

Alexandra Villing, Curator, Greece and Rome and Lesley Fitton, Honorary Research Fellow

3,000 years ago, the ancient Greek poet Homer told the story of the ill-fated city of Troy and the great Trojan War in his powerful epic, the Iliad. This mythical tale of love and war has captured imaginations ever since. You can read more about the story in our blog here.

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10 thoughts on “For centuries the city of Troy was considered a myth until it was re-discovered in 1871 in present day Turkey. The area had been excavated before but the ruins of Troy were beneath newer excavations and had gone untouched for millennia even though the site had people living on top of it.”

  1. CrysisXLayne

    the finding of this site is very contraversial, Heinrich Schliemann basically blew the site apart with dynamite, as well as possibly faking finds/lying about how old finds were etc.

  2. youngestpeartree777

    Pretty sure Heinrich Schliemann literally destroyed part of it as he was excavating it

    Edit: “Schliemann’s excavation of nine levels of archaeological remains with dynamite has been criticized as destructive of significant historical artifacts, including the level that is believed to be the historical Troy” – Stefan Lovgren “National Geographic News”. National Geographic Society

  3. creative_user_name69

    I’ve always wondered what type of ruines might be below cities and towns where nobody dug deep enough to find them.

    So much is probably undiscovered covered my thousands, maybe millions of years of natural landscape changes.

  4. klingma

    Oh Schliemann. He’s such a good example for archaeologist today of what not to do.

  5. Nagu360

    Let’s just hope they don’t find a golden apple, people might fight over it.

  6. The_Turk2

    How can it have been ever considered a myth, when Alexander the Great and others paid homage to the site many centuries later, as recorded by historians writing in the time of the Roman Empire. I think it really just depends who you asked.

  7. Breadromancer

    If you ever feel like raising your blood pressure go read about how the site was excavated 1871 by using dynamite.

  8. TrollHumper

    Humans built and destroyed more than one city, didn’t we? How do they even know it’s Troy?

  9. HowUKnowMeKennyBond

    How many other ancient archaeological sites have unknown artifacts under the ruins that we stopped at? Probably every site that’s not on solid bed rock.

  10. According1-Problem

    Oh Schliemann. He’s such a good example for archaeologist today of what not to do.

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