Search Results for: coin

900 year old African coins were found of the coast of Australia, making them the oldest foreign artefacts found on the continent, predating the Europeans by centuries.

Unravelling the mystery of Arnhem Land’s ancient African coins An AG Society-sponsored expedition set out in July 2013 to solve the mystery of 12th Century coins found in the NT. Image credit: Courtesy Powerhouse Museum MYSTERY AND MAGIC still inhabit the wild places. Few are wilder than the Northern Territory’s Wessel Islands, which arch out …

900 year old African coins were found of the coast of Australia, making them the oldest foreign artefacts found on the continent, predating the Europeans by centuries. Read More »

Two metal detectorists who thought they’d found a stash of Roman gold coins they estimated to be worth £250,000 discovered the coins were actually a worthless prop for TV show The Detectorists.

‘Roman haul’ turns out to be TV show Detectorists prop Two men who thought they had unearthed a stash of Roman gold coins had their dreams dashed when they discovered the coins were a prop for a TV sitcom. Andy Sampson and Paul Adams had been metal detecting in a field on the Suffolk/Essex border …

Two metal detectorists who thought they’d found a stash of Roman gold coins they estimated to be worth £250,000 discovered the coins were actually a worthless prop for TV show The Detectorists. Read More »

The first U.S. gold rush started in North Carolina in 1803 when a 12-year-old boy found a 17-pound gold nugget on his father’s farm. It supplied all the gold for the nation’s mints until 1829.

From 1830 to 1836, a certain bird swooped into Philadelphia’s U.S. Mint building so often that workers named him “Peter the Mint Eagle,” cared for him, and allegedly used him as a model for coin engravings for years to come. Today, it costs more than a penny to make a penny. Source: https://www.rd.com/culture/money-facts/ 16 Mind-Blowing …

The first U.S. gold rush started in North Carolina in 1803 when a 12-year-old boy found a 17-pound gold nugget on his father’s farm. It supplied all the gold for the nation’s mints until 1829. Read More »

Nearly 3,000 euros are thrown into Rome’s Trevi fountain every day, totalling over a million in the course of a year. There are regular attempts to steal the money but it is illegal to do so. The money has been used to fund a supermarket for the needy.

Trevi Fountain Coins are purportedly meant to be thrown using the right hand over the left shoulder. This was the theme of 1954’s Three Coins in the Fountain and the Academy Award-winning song by that name which introduced the picture. An estimated 3,000 euros are thrown into the fountain each day. In 2016, an estimated …

Nearly 3,000 euros are thrown into Rome’s Trevi fountain every day, totalling over a million in the course of a year. There are regular attempts to steal the money but it is illegal to do so. The money has been used to fund a supermarket for the needy. Read More »

Four high-school students in the ‘70s are the reason we no longer have pay toilets in America. They created an organization called CEPTIA, and were able to successfully lobby against the issue. 8 years later, pay toilets were all but nonexistent throughout the US.

Why Don’t We Have Pay Toilets in America? In the early 1900s, when railroads connected America’s biggest cities with rural outposts, train stations were sometimes the only place in town with modern plumbing. To keep locals from freely using the bathrooms, railroad companies installed locks on the stall doors—only to be unlocked by railroad employees …

Four high-school students in the ‘70s are the reason we no longer have pay toilets in America. They created an organization called CEPTIA, and were able to successfully lobby against the issue. 8 years later, pay toilets were all but nonexistent throughout the US. Read More »

Frank Sinatra Jr. was once kidnapped. His captors demanded all negotiations be conducted by payphone. During these conversations, Frank Sr. became concerned he wouldn’t have enough coins to keep talking, prompting him to carry 10 dimes in his pocket for the rest of his life.

Frank Sinatra Jr. Sinatra was kidnapped at the age of 19 on December 8, 1963, at Harrah’s Lake Tahoe (Room 417). He was released two days later after his father paid the $240,000 ransom demanded by the kidnappers (equivalent to $2,000,000 in 2019). Barry Keenan, Johnny Irwin, and Joe Amsler were soon captured, prosecuted for …

Frank Sinatra Jr. was once kidnapped. His captors demanded all negotiations be conducted by payphone. During these conversations, Frank Sr. became concerned he wouldn’t have enough coins to keep talking, prompting him to carry 10 dimes in his pocket for the rest of his life. Read More »

The oldest bar in the world is in Ireland. Archeological records have found that the walls of Sean’s Bar have been around, and serving, since 900 AD. Further, there are records of every owner of the pub back to its 10th century founding. It opened over 1100 years ago.

Sean’s Bar, the World’s Oldest Watering Hole A frosty pint is something special at Sean’s Bar in the central Ireland town of Athlone. The iconic public house rests in a time-honored Irish neighborhood on the River Shannon’s bank and is the oldest bar in the world, dating back to 900 AD. In the 1970’s, construction …

The oldest bar in the world is in Ireland. Archeological records have found that the walls of Sean’s Bar have been around, and serving, since 900 AD. Further, there are records of every owner of the pub back to its 10th century founding. It opened over 1100 years ago. Read More »

The Queen of England can fire the entire Australian government. In 1975 her representative in Australia fired the prime minister of Australia and the rest of parliament in response to a government shutdown. There hasn’t been another shutdown since.

Queen Elizabeth II is not like you and me. It’s true that her role as the British head of state is largely ceremonial, and the Monarch no longer holds any serious power from day to day. The historic “prerogative powers” of the Sovereign have been devolved largely to government ministers. Technically, all unmarked swans in …

The Queen of England can fire the entire Australian government. In 1975 her representative in Australia fired the prime minister of Australia and the rest of parliament in response to a government shutdown. There hasn’t been another shutdown since. Read More »