Search Results for: gold

The South Koreans gave up their gold to help their country. The gold-collecting campaign was a national sacrificial movement in early 1998 to repay its debt to the International Monetary Fund. The campaign, involving 3.51 million people nationwide, collected 227 tons of gold worth $2.13 billion.

Gold-collecting campaign In South Korea, the gold-collecting campaign was a national sacrificial movement in early 1998 to repay its debt to the International Monetary Fund. At the time, South Korea had about $304 billion in foreign-exchange debt. The campaign, involving about 3.51 million people nationwide, collected about 227 tons of gold worth about $2.13 billion. …

The South Koreans gave up their gold to help their country. The gold-collecting campaign was a national sacrificial movement in early 1998 to repay its debt to the International Monetary Fund. The campaign, involving 3.51 million people nationwide, collected 227 tons of gold worth $2.13 billion. Read More »

In 2018, World of Warcraft’s virtual gold was 7 times more valuable than Venezuela’s currency

‘World of Warcraft’s’ virtual gold is seven times more valuable than Venezuela’s real money (CNN)How worthless is the bolivar, Venezuela’s currency? You’d be better off investing in fictional currency from a video game. The virtual gold in “World of Warcraft,” the online role-playing game, is now almost seven times more valuable than real cash from …

In 2018, World of Warcraft’s virtual gold was 7 times more valuable than Venezuela’s currency Read More »

Meet Anthony Ervin, a swimmer who won a gold medal at the 2000 Olympics, retired at 22, begun abusing drugs, at one moment being hardly able to raise from a sofa for days on end. In 2011 he got back into swimming, and at the 2016 Olympics became the oldest swimmer to win a gold medal.

Gold Medalist Anthony Ervin Makes His Olympic Comeback After Drug Problems and Attempted Suicide At 35, former gold medalist Anthony Ervin is making a comeback Many of Anthony Ervin‘s competitors were just learning to read and write the last time he won a gold medal, at the 2000 Olympics in Sydney, before he abruptly retired …

Meet Anthony Ervin, a swimmer who won a gold medal at the 2000 Olympics, retired at 22, begun abusing drugs, at one moment being hardly able to raise from a sofa for days on end. In 2011 he got back into swimming, and at the 2016 Olympics became the oldest swimmer to win a gold medal. Read More »

The first U.S. gold rush started in North Carolina in 1803 when a 12-year-old boy found a 17-pound gold nugget on his father’s farm. It supplied all the gold for the nation’s mints until 1829.

From 1830 to 1836, a certain bird swooped into Philadelphia’s U.S. Mint building so often that workers named him “Peter the Mint Eagle,” cared for him, and allegedly used him as a model for coin engravings for years to come. Today, it costs more than a penny to make a penny. Source: https://www.rd.com/culture/money-facts/ 16 Mind-Blowing …

The first U.S. gold rush started in North Carolina in 1803 when a 12-year-old boy found a 17-pound gold nugget on his father’s farm. It supplied all the gold for the nation’s mints until 1829. Read More »

Two metal detectorists who thought they’d found a stash of Roman gold coins they estimated to be worth £250,000 discovered the coins were actually a worthless prop for TV show The Detectorists.

‘Roman haul’ turns out to be TV show Detectorists prop Two men who thought they had unearthed a stash of Roman gold coins had their dreams dashed when they discovered the coins were a prop for a TV sitcom. Andy Sampson and Paul Adams had been metal detecting in a field on the Suffolk/Essex border …

Two metal detectorists who thought they’d found a stash of Roman gold coins they estimated to be worth £250,000 discovered the coins were actually a worthless prop for TV show The Detectorists. Read More »

Meet King Tut’s dagger, which was found in his tomb and is believed to have been made from iron from a meteor. At the time of King Tut, iron smelting was rare and the iron would have been worth more than gold.

Tutankhamun’s meteoric iron dagger Tutankhamun’s iron dagger blade and ornamental gold sheath Tutankhamun’s iron dagger is an iron dagger originally discovered in 1925 in Tutankhamun’s 14th century BC King’s Valley tomb by archaeologist Howard Carter. The dagger is of meteorite origin. It closely correlates with meteoric composition, including homogeneity. The dagger is currently displayed at …

Meet King Tut’s dagger, which was found in his tomb and is believed to have been made from iron from a meteor. At the time of King Tut, iron smelting was rare and the iron would have been worth more than gold. Read More »

In 1928, Olympic rower Bobby Pearce stopped mid-race to let a family of ducks pass, giving his opponent a 5-length lead. In the last 1,000 meters, Pearce pulled ahead by 30 seconds, winning the gold and setting a record.

To the greatness of small Bobby Pearce : The Gentleman’s Gold ‘The most important thing in the Olympic games is not winning but taking part; the essential thing in life is not conquering but fighting well.’ Pierre de Frédy, Baron de Coubertin, founder of the Olympic committee Henry Robert Pearce was an Australian sculler of …

In 1928, Olympic rower Bobby Pearce stopped mid-race to let a family of ducks pass, giving his opponent a 5-length lead. In the last 1,000 meters, Pearce pulled ahead by 30 seconds, winning the gold and setting a record. Read More »

In 1836, a sewer worker accidentally discovered an old drain which ran directly into the Bank of England’s gold vault. He wrote letters to the directors of the bank and requested a meeting inside the vault at an hour of their choosing – and popped out of the floor to greet them

Underground Vaults, Gold Bars, and A Secret Entrance: The Unlikely History of the Bank of England Today, the Bank of England may have offices in a modern, glass building in Leeds, but its main site still cuts an imposing, columned figure on Threadneedle Street in the City of London. Once upon a time, the bank …

In 1836, a sewer worker accidentally discovered an old drain which ran directly into the Bank of England’s gold vault. He wrote letters to the directors of the bank and requested a meeting inside the vault at an hour of their choosing – and popped out of the floor to greet them Read More »

George Foreman has earned substantially more from the George Foreman Grill than he ever did from his boxing career. At the peak of sales he earned $4.5 million a month in payouts. In 1999, he was paid $138 million for the full rights to use his name.

George Foreman For other people named George Foreman, see George Foreman (disambiguation). George Edward Foreman (born January 10, 1949) is an American former professional boxer, entrepreneur, minister and author. As a professional boxer, he was nicknamed “Big George” and competed between 1969 and 1997. He is a two-time world heavyweight champion and an Olympic gold …

George Foreman has earned substantially more from the George Foreman Grill than he ever did from his boxing career. At the peak of sales he earned $4.5 million a month in payouts. In 1999, he was paid $138 million for the full rights to use his name. Read More »

Meet the California Genocide, an oft-forgotten event in U.S. history due to occurring at the same time at the California Gold Rush. The Native American population of California decreased from as many as 150,000 in 1848 to 30,000 in 1870. Tribes such as the Yahi were hunted to extinction.

California genocide For the conflicts during the settling of California by the United States, see California Indian Wars. For the system of forced labour for indigenous people during the California Genocide, see Unfree labour in California. The California genocide consisted of actions taken by the United States in the 19th century, following the American Conquest …

Meet the California Genocide, an oft-forgotten event in U.S. history due to occurring at the same time at the California Gold Rush. The Native American population of California decreased from as many as 150,000 in 1848 to 30,000 in 1870. Tribes such as the Yahi were hunted to extinction. Read More »