Search Results for: independence

Due to a strong dislike towards mixing of science and politics, Einstein said were he a young man again, he’d choose to be a plumber or a peddler, to which many plumbing companies responded by making him the honorary plumber. Also, there are many Einstein Plumbing companies in the US now.

Albert Einstein said if he could do it all again, he would be a plumber. In November 1954, Albert Einstein wrote a letter to a magazine in which he declared that, were he a young man again, he would not try to become a scientist: “I would rather choose to be a plumber or a …

Due to a strong dislike towards mixing of science and politics, Einstein said were he a young man again, he’d choose to be a plumber or a peddler, to which many plumbing companies responded by making him the honorary plumber. Also, there are many Einstein Plumbing companies in the US now. Read More »

George Washington died when his doctors tried to cure his epiglottitis (i.e. inflamed throat) with blood letting. He lost more than half his blood before they stopped the treatment, and died just hours later.

George Washington This article is about first president of the United States. For other uses, see George Washington (disambiguation). George Washington (February 22, 1732[b][c] – December 14, 1799) was an American political leader, military general, statesman, and Founding Father who also served as the first president of the United States from 1789 to 1797. He …

George Washington died when his doctors tried to cure his epiglottitis (i.e. inflamed throat) with blood letting. He lost more than half his blood before they stopped the treatment, and died just hours later. Read More »

Even though Benjamin Franklin is credited with many popular inventions, he never patented or copyrighted any of them. He believed that they should be given freely and that claiming ownership would only cause trouble and “sour one’s Temper and disturb one’s Quiet.”

Benjamin Franklin Never Sought a Patent or Copyright It’s fairly common knowledge that Ben Franklin, a member of the Committee of Five responsible for the drafting of the Declaration of Independence, was one of America’s first great entrepreneurs. From an extremely humble background (the youngest son of 17 children of a candle-maker), his businesses and …

Even though Benjamin Franklin is credited with many popular inventions, he never patented or copyrighted any of them. He believed that they should be given freely and that claiming ownership would only cause trouble and “sour one’s Temper and disturb one’s Quiet.” Read More »

Marie Curie, the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, the first person to win twice, and the only person to win a Nobel Prize in two different sciences couldn’t legally attend college, so she did it illegally, going to what was known as the ‘Flying University’, a secret organization.

Marie Curie – Early Years Maria Skłodowska was born in Warsaw, in Congress Poland in the Russian Empire, on 7 November 1867, the fifth and youngest child of well-known teachers Bronisława, née Boguska, and Władysław Skłodowski. The elder siblings of Maria (nicknamed Mania) were Zofia (born 1862, nicknamed Zosia), Józef [pl] (born 1863, nicknamed Józio), Bronisława (born 1865, nicknamed Bronia) and Helena (born 1866, nicknamed Hela). On both the paternal and maternal sides, …

Marie Curie, the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, the first person to win twice, and the only person to win a Nobel Prize in two different sciences couldn’t legally attend college, so she did it illegally, going to what was known as the ‘Flying University’, a secret organization. Read More »

As President McKinley was dying, no one knew where Vice President Teddy Roosevelt was. When located in the wilderness he raced all night down mountain roads on a buckboard wagon in pitch black and pouring rains to be sworn in.

Only a few hours ago, he had been missing, hundreds of miles away from the dying President on the slopes of New York’s highest peak, Mount Marcy. Vice President Theodore Roosevelt’s wild midnight ride to the Oval Office was set in motion with an assassin’s bullet, an eerily trending catalyst of change in the preceding …

As President McKinley was dying, no one knew where Vice President Teddy Roosevelt was. When located in the wilderness he raced all night down mountain roads on a buckboard wagon in pitch black and pouring rains to be sworn in. Read More »

It was Thomas Jefferson was a serious foodie, who introduced America to waffles, Mac and cheese, Parmesan, olive oil, and champagne.

Today is Thomas Jefferson’s birthday, and what might the president, on his special day, have had to eat? And the meal may have been polished off with ice cream, pastry, pudding, or crème brûlée, and followed up with an after-dinner glass of Madeira, which Jefferson believed was good for the health. Though common dogma holds …

It was Thomas Jefferson was a serious foodie, who introduced America to waffles, Mac and cheese, Parmesan, olive oil, and champagne. Read More »

In 1949 the Costa Rican government abolished their army, stating that the army “would be replaced with an army of teachers.” The country has free universal public education and a literacy rate of 97%.

Costa Rica (/ˌkɒstə ˈriːkə/ (listen); Spanish: [ˈkosta ˈrika]; literally “Rich Coast”), officially the Republic of Costa Rica (Spanish: República de Costa Rica), is a country in Central America, bordered by Nicaragua to the north, the Caribbean Sea to the northeast, Panama to the southeast, the Pacific Ocean to the southwest, and Ecuador to the south …

In 1949 the Costa Rican government abolished their army, stating that the army “would be replaced with an army of teachers.” The country has free universal public education and a literacy rate of 97%. Read More »