Search Results for: nuclear

Bikini Bottom was named for Bikini Atoll where the US conducted nuclear tests from 1946 – 1958, which is why all the explosions from SpongeBob look like nuclear explosions.

SpongeBomb Square Pants and the Anniversary of Castle Bravo While SpongeBob doesn’t quite depict the horrors of nuclear testing, its inspiration does. SpongeBob’s home, Bikini Bottom, was named for Bikini Atoll where the U.S. conducted nuclear tests from 1946 to 1958. References to the destructive nuclear tests are littered throughout the show, ranging from a …

Bikini Bottom was named for Bikini Atoll where the US conducted nuclear tests from 1946 – 1958, which is why all the explosions from SpongeBob look like nuclear explosions. Read More »

Fungi are growing on the walls of Chernobyl’s ruined nuclear reactor. They seem to absorb radiation and convert it into chemical energy for growth.

Fungi That ‘Eat’ Radiation Are Growing on the Walls of Chernobyl’s Ruined Nuclear Reactor In the eerie environment inside the abandoned Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, researchers remotely piloting robots spotted pitch black fungi growing on the walls of the decimated No. 4 nuclear reactor and even apparently breaking down radioactive graphite from the core itself. …

Fungi are growing on the walls of Chernobyl’s ruined nuclear reactor. They seem to absorb radiation and convert it into chemical energy for growth. Read More »

One nuclear fuel pellet, roughly the size of a pencil eraser, provides as much energy as one ton of coal or nearly 150 gallons of oil.

Vogtle Receives First Shipment of Nuclear Fuel The two-unit expansion of the Vogtle nuclear power plant in Georgia reached another milestone as Georgia Power received the first shipment of nuclear fuel for Unit 3 of the project. The utility on Dec. 9 said receipt of the fuel follows completion and inspection of several construction areas …

One nuclear fuel pellet, roughly the size of a pencil eraser, provides as much energy as one ton of coal or nearly 150 gallons of oil. Read More »

Underneath the streets of Beijing, there are over a million people who live in nuclear bunkers.

A Million People Live in These Underground Nuclear Bunkers In the late ’60s and ‘70s, anticipating the devastation of a Cold War-nuclear fallout, Chairman Mao directed Chinese cities to construct apartments with bomb shelters capable of withstanding the blast of a nuclear bomb. In Beijing alone, roughly 10,000 bunkers were promptly constructed. But when China …

Underneath the streets of Beijing, there are over a million people who live in nuclear bunkers. Read More »

After the Reagan assassination attempt, the top aides didn’t have the briefcase containing the codes for launching nuclear missiles, the Veep was unavailable, & no-one knew what to do. A Soviet sub then moved closer than usual to the US.

Nuclear button chaos behind Reagan By Katty Kay in Washington Audio tapes just released reveal the confusion among top presidential aides over the wherabouts of the triggers for the US nuclear arsenal as Ronald Reagan recovered from an assassination attempt. In the first few minutes after the 1981 shooting by John Hinckley, Mr Reagan’s top …

After the Reagan assassination attempt, the top aides didn’t have the briefcase containing the codes for launching nuclear missiles, the Veep was unavailable, & no-one knew what to do. A Soviet sub then moved closer than usual to the US. Read More »

The likely record for fastest manmade object is a manhole cover launched by a nuclear bomb. A high-speed camera recording the lid only caught one frame of it moving meaning it was traveling over 125,000 miles per hour

The fastest object ever launched was a manhole cover — here’s the story from the guy who shot it into space Two angles facing left, which often indicate, “return to the beginning.” Two angles facing right, which often indicate, “advance to the end.” When I first heard this story, I didn’t believe it. How could …

The likely record for fastest manmade object is a manhole cover launched by a nuclear bomb. A high-speed camera recording the lid only caught one frame of it moving meaning it was traveling over 125,000 miles per hour Read More »

Modern nuclear submarines are so well cloaked that in 2009, two French and British nuclear ballistic missle subs collided in the atlantic ocean by pure chance. Moving very slowly, they were’t able to detect each other just feet apart.

HMS Vanguard and Le Triomphant submarine collision Nuclear submarine HMS Vanguard arrives back at HM Naval Base Clyde, Faslane, Scotland following a patrol. A Triomphant-class submarine (here, Vigilant) The submarines HMS Vanguard and Triomphant collided in the Atlantic Ocean in the night between 3–4 February 2009. Both are nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarines. The Royal Navy’s …

Modern nuclear submarines are so well cloaked that in 2009, two French and British nuclear ballistic missle subs collided in the atlantic ocean by pure chance. Moving very slowly, they were’t able to detect each other just feet apart. Read More »

When Robert Ballard (professor of oceanography) announced a mission to find the Titanic, it was a cover story for a classified mission to search for lost nuclear submarines. They finished before they were due back, so the team spent the extra time looking for the Titanic and actually found it.

Titanic Was Found During Secret Cold War Navy Mission Editor’s Note: Twenty years ago, James Cameron’s blockbuster film “Titanic” entranced audiences around the globe. But it was less than 10 years ago that Robert Ballard, the oceanographer who discovered the Titanic in 1985, revealed to the world that he found the famous shipwreck as the …

When Robert Ballard (professor of oceanography) announced a mission to find the Titanic, it was a cover story for a classified mission to search for lost nuclear submarines. They finished before they were due back, so the team spent the extra time looking for the Titanic and actually found it. Read More »

Meet Nyarri Morgan, an Australian aboriginal man who had no contact with the Western world until he witnessed – with no context – an atomic test and its resulting effects

Aboriginal man’s story of Maralinga nuclear bomb survival told with virtual reality Space to play or pause, M to mute, left and right arrows to seek, up and down arrows for volume.WatchDuration: 5 minutes 33 seconds5m In an unlikely collision of cultures, state-of-the-art 3D film technology is bringing an Aboriginal man’s unique tale of nuclear …

Meet Nyarri Morgan, an Australian aboriginal man who had no contact with the Western world until he witnessed – with no context – an atomic test and its resulting effects Read More »

In 1981 a man named Roger Fischer had an idea for a volunteer to have ICBM launch codes put in their chest cavity. In the event of an emergency, the volunteer would carry a knife to be killed with. It was meant to force the personal killing of one man to start the impersonal killing of millions.

In 1981, Harvard law professor Roger Fisher, director of the Harvard Negotiation Project, published a thought experiment in the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists: what if the codes to launch nuclear war were kept inside the chest-cavity of a young volunteer, and the President would have to hack them out of this young man’s chest before …

In 1981 a man named Roger Fischer had an idea for a volunteer to have ICBM launch codes put in their chest cavity. In the event of an emergency, the volunteer would carry a knife to be killed with. It was meant to force the personal killing of one man to start the impersonal killing of millions. Read More »