Search Results for: technology

The Bluetooth symbol is a bind-rune representing the initials of the Viking King for who it was named.

Harald Bluetooth Harald “Bluetooth” Gormsson (Old Norse: Haraldr Gormsson; Danish: Harald Blåtand Gormsen, died c. 985/86) was a king of Denmark and Norway. He was the son of King Gorm the Old and of Thyra Dannebod. Harald ruled as king of Denmark from c. 958 – c. 986. Harald introduced Christianity to Denmark and consolidated his rule over most of Jutland and Zealand. Harald’s rule as king of Norway following the assassination of King Harald Greycloak of Norway was …

The Bluetooth symbol is a bind-rune representing the initials of the Viking King for who it was named. Read More »

In 1964, three physicists who just got their PhDs were tasked with developing a working design for a nuclear weapon using only unclassified information. The goal is to see if a country can develop a nuclear weapon without aid. They accomplished it within 2 and a half years.

Nth Country Experiment Could any country with the right knowledge and technology build a nuclear bomb? From May 1964 to April 1967, the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory (the predecessor to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) set out to answer this question. The Laboratory hired three physicists who only recently received …

In 1964, three physicists who just got their PhDs were tasked with developing a working design for a nuclear weapon using only unclassified information. The goal is to see if a country can develop a nuclear weapon without aid. They accomplished it within 2 and a half years. Read More »

Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak has disdain for money and large wealth accumulation. In 2017 he said he didn’t want to be near money, because it could corrupt your values. When Apple went public, Wozniak offered $10 million of his stock to early Apple employees, something Jobs refused to do.

Steve Wozniak Not to be confused with Steven Woznick. Stephen Gary Wozniak (/ˈwɒzniæk/; born August 11, 1950),(p18)(p27) also known by his nickname “Woz”, is an American electronics engineer, programmer, philanthropist, and technology entrepreneur. In 1976, he co-founded Apple Inc. with business partner Steve Jobs, which later became the world’s largest information technology company by revenue …

Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak has disdain for money and large wealth accumulation. In 2017 he said he didn’t want to be near money, because it could corrupt your values. When Apple went public, Wozniak offered $10 million of his stock to early Apple employees, something Jobs refused to do. Read More »

Meet Nyarri Morgan, an Australian aboriginal man who had no contact with the Western world until he witnessed – with no context – an atomic test and its resulting effects

Aboriginal man’s story of Maralinga nuclear bomb survival told with virtual reality Space to play or pause, M to mute, left and right arrows to seek, up and down arrows for volume.WatchDuration: 5 minutes 33 seconds5m In an unlikely collision of cultures, state-of-the-art 3D film technology is bringing an Aboriginal man’s unique tale of nuclear …

Meet Nyarri Morgan, an Australian aboriginal man who had no contact with the Western world until he witnessed – with no context – an atomic test and its resulting effects Read More »

It took 75 years for 100 million people to get access to the telephone; the gaming app “Pokemon Go” hooked that many users in less than one month in 2016. That is how fast the digital revolution is compared to other transformations.

Everything you need to know about the Fourth Industrial Revolution watch now The Fourth Industrial Revolution will take center stage at the World Economic Forum’s (WEF) annual meeting next week in Davos, Switzerland. The concept, a theme of Davos this year, refers to how a combination of technologies are changing the way we live, work …

It took 75 years for 100 million people to get access to the telephone; the gaming app “Pokemon Go” hooked that many users in less than one month in 2016. That is how fast the digital revolution is compared to other transformations. Read More »

The U.S. Navy employed a dolphin, Tuffy, to regularly deliver tools and mail to scientists living in an experimental underwater laboratory.

SEALAB II: Porpoise Post and Life Beneath the Waves It may come as no surprise to you all (seeing as I am a digital archivist who spends all day with technology) but I am a self-admitted nerd, complete with a love of video games. One of my favorite games – and one I suggest to …

The U.S. Navy employed a dolphin, Tuffy, to regularly deliver tools and mail to scientists living in an experimental underwater laboratory. Read More »

Vitamin A enriched rice, developed nearly 15 years ago, could have prevented hundreds of thousands of cases of childhood blindness. It has never been used due to concerns over GMO foods.

The economic power of the Golden Rice opposition Vitamin A enriched rice (Golden Rice) is a cost-efficient solution that can substantially reduce health costs. Despite Golden Rice being available since early 2000, this rice has not been introduced in any country. Governments must perceive additional costs that overcompensate the benefits of the technology to explain …

Vitamin A enriched rice, developed nearly 15 years ago, could have prevented hundreds of thousands of cases of childhood blindness. It has never been used due to concerns over GMO foods. Read More »

Meet a “cargo cult” in the South Pacific who worship an American soldier named John Frum. The cult started after American troops visited the island in WWII, with much more advanced technology than the indigenous people had ever seen. The cult believes John Frum will one day return, bringing cargo.

In John They Trust In the morning heat on a tropical island halfway across the world from the United States, several dark-skinned men—clad in what look to be U.S. Army uniforms—appear on a mound overlooking a bamboo-hut village. One reverently carries Old Glory, precisely folded to reveal only the stars. On the command of a …

Meet a “cargo cult” in the South Pacific who worship an American soldier named John Frum. The cult started after American troops visited the island in WWII, with much more advanced technology than the indigenous people had ever seen. The cult believes John Frum will one day return, bringing cargo. Read More »

Pixar’s Cars lost the 2006 Best Animated Feature Oscar to Happy Feet, which used motion capture technology. Their next film, Ratatouille, has a stamp in the credits saying “100% Genuine Animation! No motion capture or any other performance shortcuts were used in the production of this film”

Motion capture Motion capture performers from Buckinghamshire New University Video games often use motion capture to animate athletes, martial artists, and other in-game characters. This has been done since the Sega Model 2 arcade game Virtua Fighter 2 in 1994. By mid-1995 the use of motion capture in video game development had become commonplace, and …

Pixar’s Cars lost the 2006 Best Animated Feature Oscar to Happy Feet, which used motion capture technology. Their next film, Ratatouille, has a stamp in the credits saying “100% Genuine Animation! No motion capture or any other performance shortcuts were used in the production of this film” Read More »

Trey Parker had to deliberately sing off key to get auto-tune to work, saying “If you use it and you sing into it correctly, it doesn’t do anything to your voice.”

Auto-Tune is an audio processor created by Antares Audio Technologies which uses a proprietary device to measure and alter pitch in vocal and instrumental music recording and performances.[5] It was originally intended to disguise or correct off-key inaccuracies, allowing vocal tracks to be perfectly tuned despite originally being slightly off-pitch. Starting with Cher’s 1998 hit …

Trey Parker had to deliberately sing off key to get auto-tune to work, saying “If you use it and you sing into it correctly, it doesn’t do anything to your voice.” Read More »