Search Results for: technology

Buzz Aldrin, the second man on the moon, singlehandedly calculated an orbital technique called “Mars Cycling” which would allow for spacecraft to perpetually travel between Earth and Mars with only a single initial boost. Crew would board and return via a secondary spacecraft, saving fuel.

Mars cycler Buzz Aldrin, discoverer of the Aldrin cycler A Mars cycler (or Earth–Mars cycler) is a kind of spacecraft trajectory that encounters Earth and Mars regularly. The term Mars cycler may also refer to a spacecraft on a Mars cycler trajectory. The Aldrin cycler is an example of a Mars cycler. Cyclers are potentially …

Buzz Aldrin, the second man on the moon, singlehandedly calculated an orbital technique called “Mars Cycling” which would allow for spacecraft to perpetually travel between Earth and Mars with only a single initial boost. Crew would board and return via a secondary spacecraft, saving fuel. Read More »

Neil Armstrong’s heart rate spiked to 150+ when NASA turned the control over to him for the moon landing.

The Apollo 11 mission as told through the astronauts’ heart rates Those heart rate figures are what aerospace experts would expect to see for experienced, physically fit astronauts enduring the stresses of the launch. All three had flown to space before, during the Gemini program, and during that first launch, all three of their beating …

Neil Armstrong’s heart rate spiked to 150+ when NASA turned the control over to him for the moon landing. Read More »

Auto-Tune, introduced in 1997, which uses a proprietary device to measure and alter pitch in vocal and instrumental music recording and performances was named one of the 50 worst inventions by Time magazine.

The 50 Worst Inventions It’s a technology that can make bad singers sound good and really bad singers (like T-Pain, pictured here) sound like robots. And it gives singers who sound like Kanye West or Cher the misplaced confidence that they too can croon. Thanks a lot, computers.

NASA’s longest serving female employee since January 1958, Sue Finley, has been an engineer and programmer for space missions since Explorer 1, for missions to the Moon, Sun, all the planets and many other solar system bodies, and recipient of NASA’s Exceptional Public Service Medal.

Susan G. Finley Susan G. Finley, a native Californian, has been an employee of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) since January 1958, making her the longest-serving woman in NASA. Two days before Explorer 1 was launched, Finley began her career with the laboratory as a human computer, calculating rocket launch trajectories by hand. She now …

NASA’s longest serving female employee since January 1958, Sue Finley, has been an engineer and programmer for space missions since Explorer 1, for missions to the Moon, Sun, all the planets and many other solar system bodies, and recipient of NASA’s Exceptional Public Service Medal. Read More »

In 1969, at the height of the Cold War, the Apollo 11 crew carried commemorative medals to the moon to honor two Soviet cosmonauts who died as part of the USSR’s human spaceflight program

Statement About Honoring American and Russian Space Heroes During the Apollo 11 Mission THE TWO MEN we hope will set foot on the moon represent all mankind. Their achievement will be the world’s achievement. It is fitting, therefore, that the first lunar explorers carry with them some recognition of the sacrifice made by other space …

In 1969, at the height of the Cold War, the Apollo 11 crew carried commemorative medals to the moon to honor two Soviet cosmonauts who died as part of the USSR’s human spaceflight program Read More »

When the replacement crew for Skylab entered the empty space station, they found that it wasn’t empty at all: 3 figures were inside. Upon further inspection, the replacement crew found out that these were dummies placed in flight suits by the previous Skylab crew before they left.

Skylab 4 Skylab 4 (also SL-4 and SLM-3) was the third crewed Skylab mission and placed the third and final crew aboard the first American space station. The mission started on November 16, 1973 with the launch of three astronauts on an Apollo command and service module on a Saturn IB rocket from the Kennedy …

When the replacement crew for Skylab entered the empty space station, they found that it wasn’t empty at all: 3 figures were inside. Upon further inspection, the replacement crew found out that these were dummies placed in flight suits by the previous Skylab crew before they left. Read More »

The common method for a spacecraft to shift between two orbits is called a Hohmann Transfer, and that the guy who calculated it (in 1925) was inspired by a science fiction book written in 1897, which gave a generally correct explanation of the concept of orbit trajectory

Hohmann transfer orbit Hohmann transfer orbit, labelled 2, from an orbit (1) to a higher orbit (3) An example of a Hohmann transfer orbit between Earth and Mars, as used by the NASA InSight probe. Hohman · Earth · Mars In orbital mechanics, the Hohmann transfer orbit (/ˈhoʊmən/) is an elliptical orbit used to transfer …

The common method for a spacecraft to shift between two orbits is called a Hohmann Transfer, and that the guy who calculated it (in 1925) was inspired by a science fiction book written in 1897, which gave a generally correct explanation of the concept of orbit trajectory Read More »

After landing on the moon during Apollo 11, Buzz Aldrin accidentally damaged the circuit breaker that would arm the ascent engine that would get them off the moon. The astronauts activated the engine by triggering the circuit with a felt-tipped pen.

Apollo 11 This article is about the 1969 crewed lunar mission. For other uses, see Apollo 11 (disambiguation). Apollo 11 was the spaceflight that first landed humans on the Moon. Commander Neil Armstrong and lunar module pilot Buzz Aldrin formed the American crew that landed the Apollo Lunar Module Eagle on July 20, 1969, at …

After landing on the moon during Apollo 11, Buzz Aldrin accidentally damaged the circuit breaker that would arm the ascent engine that would get them off the moon. The astronauts activated the engine by triggering the circuit with a felt-tipped pen. Read More »

If funding remained at 1969 Apollo mission levels, NASA planned to develop such elements as a lunar orbit station in 1978, a lunar surface base in 1980, and a manned mission to Mars in 1981 or 1983

Just another Apollo? Part two In mid-1969, as the Apollo missions were reaching their climax, NASA managers began to plan for the next phase of lunar exploration. This optimistic plan, issued by the Space Task Group, would have had NASA’s funding stay at Apollo levels, and, in a series of steps that followed Apollo, would …

If funding remained at 1969 Apollo mission levels, NASA planned to develop such elements as a lunar orbit station in 1978, a lunar surface base in 1980, and a manned mission to Mars in 1981 or 1983 Read More »