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Literary Classics

What was the Novel “The Great Gatsby” Based On?

Familiar to many because of the original 1925 American classic novel and its numerous film adaptations, The Great Gatsby continues to be F. Scott Fitzgerald’s most famous work. The Great Gatsby is an authentic reflection of Fitzgerald’s life and not only that, but it also shares many plot similarities to the short story of his …

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How Did “A Christmas Carol” Influence People in 1867?

Charles Dickens is one of the greatest authors of modern times. He gave us classics like Oliver Twist and Great Expectations. But did you know that his A Christmas Carol had a significant impact on the lives of those who read it? Dickens’ “A Christmas Carol” influenced many people since its publication. It promoted generosity …

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What Did George Orwell Name the Torture Chamber in His Novel?

George Orwell was known for his significant contribution to literature. He wrote six novels and several essays in his time. One of his notable works is the book Animal Farm. But did you know the controversy behind his work entitled 1984?  The torture chamber in George Orwell’s novel 1984 was named Room 101 after a …

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What Happened to Franz Kafka?

Franz Kafka’s brilliance was acknowledged worldwide years after his death. Although short-lived, Franz Kafka produced many literary works that continue to influence writers in various genres. His legacy lives on with his compositions.  Many would wonder about the great author. Unfortunately, Franz Kafka suffered from laryngeal tuberculosis. He was struggling to eat or drink due …

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Who Originally Published Frank Herbert’s Book Dune?

If you are a fan of the Dune saga, you’d be surprised to know that Frank Herbert had to go to different publishing companies before the first book was published. But which company took a leap of faith? After several rejections, the Chilton Book Company published the first edition of Frank Herbert’s Dune series. Before …

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The crime that led Sisyphus to push a boulder was cheating death. He made his wife not bury him properly before he died, chained death, and tricked Persephone into letting him briefly return to earth to scold his wife and ran away instead of returning to hell.

Sisyphus Sisyphus was the king of Ephyra (Corinth) in Greek mythology. He was the son of King Aeolus of Thessaly and Enarete. He founded Ephyra, which he ruled over as its first king. His spouse was the nymph Merope, with whom he had four children; Glaucus, Ornytion, Almus, and Thersander. Although Sisyphus helped its city …

The crime that led Sisyphus to push a boulder was cheating death. He made his wife not bury him properly before he died, chained death, and tricked Persephone into letting him briefly return to earth to scold his wife and ran away instead of returning to hell. Read More »

Arthur Conan Doyle and Harry Houdini were friends at one point, however Doyle refused to accept Houdini performed using trickery and believed he had supernatural powers. Their friendship ended after Houdini exposed séance mediums who claimed to have powers to talk to the dead.

Arthur Conan Doyle “Conan Doyle” redirects here. For the rugby player, see Conan Doyle (rugby union). Sir Arthur Ignatius Conan Doyle KStJ DL (22 May 1859 – 7 July 1930) was a British writer and physician. He created the character Sherlock Holmes in 1887 for A Study in Scarlet, the first of four novels and …

Arthur Conan Doyle and Harry Houdini were friends at one point, however Doyle refused to accept Houdini performed using trickery and believed he had supernatural powers. Their friendship ended after Houdini exposed séance mediums who claimed to have powers to talk to the dead. Read More »

In 1865, Charles Dickens was traveling home from France when his train derailed while crossing a bridge, and his car was left dangling from the tracks. He helped save stranded passengers and then climbed back into the dangling car to find a manuscript he was supposed to send to his publishers.

18 Facts About Charles Dickens It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, and Charles Dickens wrote it all down—the gruesome truths about Victorian England and the perils of Britain’s social class system. His unprecedented celebrity made him the most popular novelist of his century, and since then Charles Dickens’s books …

In 1865, Charles Dickens was traveling home from France when his train derailed while crossing a bridge, and his car was left dangling from the tracks. He helped save stranded passengers and then climbed back into the dangling car to find a manuscript he was supposed to send to his publishers. Read More »

Molière’s legendary death: collapsing on stage while performing in the last play he had written, insisting on completing his performance, collapsing again, died hours afterwards.

Molière This article is about the French playwright. For other uses, see Molière (disambiguation). Jean-Baptiste Poquelin (15 January 1622 (baptised) – 17 February 1673), known by his stage name Molière (UK: /ˈmɒliɛər, ˈmoʊl-/, US: /moʊlˈjɛər, ˌmoʊliˈɛər/, French: [mɔljɛʁ]), was a French playwright, actor and poet, widely regarded as one of the greatest writers in the …

Molière’s legendary death: collapsing on stage while performing in the last play he had written, insisting on completing his performance, collapsing again, died hours afterwards. Read More »