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How Did the Greeks Hide Museum Artifacts from the Nazis?

The Nazis had expected thousands of antiques when they entered the National Archaeological Museum. The only barrier that kept them from stealing the hidden riches was the persistent effort of the museum’s workers.  The Greek Ministry of Culture devised a plan to ensure the utmost protection of their priceless relics. Following their orders, the National …

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What is the Story of the Naram-Sin of Akkad?

Religious relics have been found all over the world. But why was the sculpture by the mountainside of a small Kurdish town important? Let’s find out why Naram-Sin is considered a relic and what made it special. For centuries, Kurdish locals knew an ancient rock relief simply as Naram-Sin. Later, archaeologists identified it to be …

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John D. Rockefeller was the world’s first Billionaire and it was his near-monopoly oil business in the USA that necessitated the federal and states governments to create Antitrust laws.

John D. Rockefeller Who Was John D. Rockefeller? American industrialist John D. Rockefeller built his first oil refinery near Cleveland and in 1870 incorporated the Standard Oil Company. By 1882 he had a near-monopoly of the oil business in the United States, but his business practices led to the passing of antitrust laws. Later in …

John D. Rockefeller was the world’s first Billionaire and it was his near-monopoly oil business in the USA that necessitated the federal and states governments to create Antitrust laws. Read More »

After Puyi, the last Emperor of China, was dethroned, he worked as a street cleaner and would visit the Forbidden Palace as a tourist and point out the various objects on display that he used to own as Emperor.

Puyi For other uses, see Puyi (disambiguation). Puyi (Chinese: 溥儀; 7 February 1906 – 17 October 1967) was the last Emperor of China as the eleventh and final Qing dynasty ruler. Becoming the Xuantong Emperor at age two but forced to abdicate on 12 February 1912 due to the Xinhai Revolution, he later served as …

After Puyi, the last Emperor of China, was dethroned, he worked as a street cleaner and would visit the Forbidden Palace as a tourist and point out the various objects on display that he used to own as Emperor. Read More »

In 427BC Athens sent a ship to Mytilene which had instructions to kill all adult men in the city-state. The next day, Athenians voted to change their decision – a second ship was dispatched. Racing through the night, it reached Mytilene just in time to prevent the massacre from happening.

Mytilenean Debate Allies in the Peloponnesian War. The Mytilenean Debate (also spelled “Mytilenaean Debate”) is the Athenian Assembly concerning reprisals against the city-state of Mytilene, which had attempted unsuccessfully to shake off Athenian hegemony during the Peloponnesian War. The Debate occurred in 427 B.C.; Thucydides reports it in book three of his History of the …

In 427BC Athens sent a ship to Mytilene which had instructions to kill all adult men in the city-state. The next day, Athenians voted to change their decision – a second ship was dispatched. Racing through the night, it reached Mytilene just in time to prevent the massacre from happening. Read More »

Female gladiators or “gladiatrices” existed in ancient Rome, but were rare because it was considered unwomanly. One gladiatrix of note was a woman who fought wild boars with a spear while topless, and who would squat to urinate in front of a stunned crowd.

Gladiatrix This article is about female Roman gladiators. For other uses, see Gladiatrix (disambiguation). The gladiatrix (plural gladiatrices) is the female equivalent of the gladiator of ancient Rome. Like their male counterparts, female gladiators fought each other, or wild animals, to entertain audiences at various games and festivals. Very little is known about them. They …

Female gladiators or “gladiatrices” existed in ancient Rome, but were rare because it was considered unwomanly. One gladiatrix of note was a woman who fought wild boars with a spear while topless, and who would squat to urinate in front of a stunned crowd. Read More »

Slaveholders in the US knew that enslaved people were escaping to Mexico, the U.S. tried to get Mexico to sign a fugitive slave treaty, but Mexico refused to sign such a treaty, insisting that all enslaved people were free once they set foot on Mexican soil.

The Little-Known Underground Railroad That Ran South to Mexico The Underground Railroad ran south as well as north. For slaves in Texas, refuge in Canada must have seemed impossibly far away. Fortunately, slavery was also illegal in Mexico. Researchers estimate 5,000 to 10,000 people escaped from bondage into Mexico, says Maria Hammack, who is writing …

Slaveholders in the US knew that enslaved people were escaping to Mexico, the U.S. tried to get Mexico to sign a fugitive slave treaty, but Mexico refused to sign such a treaty, insisting that all enslaved people were free once they set foot on Mexican soil. Read More »