Military

In 1932 Admiral Harry E. Yarnell launched a simulated carrier attack on Pearl Harbour, in almost exactly the same way as the actual Japanese attack 10 years later. Declared a total success by umpires, Yarnell warned of the vulnerability. Naval Intelligence knew Japanese writers reported on it.

Harry E. Yarnell Admiral Harry Ervin Yarnell (18 October 1875 – 7 July 1959) was an American naval officer whose career spanned over 51 years and three wars, from the Spanish–American War through World War II. Among his achievements was proving, in 1932 war games, that Pearl Harbor was vulnerable to a naval aerial attack. …

In 1932 Admiral Harry E. Yarnell launched a simulated carrier attack on Pearl Harbour, in almost exactly the same way as the actual Japanese attack 10 years later. Declared a total success by umpires, Yarnell warned of the vulnerability. Naval Intelligence knew Japanese writers reported on it. Read More »

During WW1, Australian Soldiers at the Second Battle of Villers-Bretonneux managed to steal a German tank as a trophy and transport it to Australia. Today it stands as the only surviving A7V Sturmpanzerwagen.

Mephisto (tank) Mephisto after recovery from the battlefield. Jun 14, 1919, Mephisto Tank unloads off the SS Armagh at Brisbane Mephisto Tank lands at Brisbane “Mephisto” on display in the Australian War Memorial, July 2015. Mephisto is a World War I German tank, the only surviving example of an A7V. In April 1918, during a …

During WW1, Australian Soldiers at the Second Battle of Villers-Bretonneux managed to steal a German tank as a trophy and transport it to Australia. Today it stands as the only surviving A7V Sturmpanzerwagen. Read More »

Meet the Battle of the Wabash or St. Clair’s defeat. When an American army of 1000 men was slaughtered by a Native American force of near equal strength in 1791. Only 28 men escaped unscathed with a casualty rate of 97%, it remains the largest defeat in American history.

St. Clair’s defeat St. Clair’s defeat, also known as the Battle of the Wabash, the Battle of Wabash River or the Battle of a Thousand Slain, was a battle fought on November 4, 1791, in the Northwest Territory of the United States of America. The U.S. Army faced the Western Confederacy of Native Americans, as …

Meet the Battle of the Wabash or St. Clair’s defeat. When an American army of 1000 men was slaughtered by a Native American force of near equal strength in 1791. Only 28 men escaped unscathed with a casualty rate of 97%, it remains the largest defeat in American history. Read More »

Major Walter Reed, after whom Walter Reed Medical Center was named, led the team that confirmed that yellow fever is transmitted by mosquitoes

Walter Reed This article is about the U.S. army surgeon. For other uses, see Walter Reed (disambiguation). Major Walter Reed (September 13, 1851 – November 22, 1902), was a U.S. Army physician who in 1901, led the team that confirmed the theory of the Cuban doctor Carlos Finlay that yellow fever is transmitted by a …

Major Walter Reed, after whom Walter Reed Medical Center was named, led the team that confirmed that yellow fever is transmitted by mosquitoes Read More »

Military Headstone; If you leave a penny, it means you visited. A nickel means that you and the deceased soldier trained at boot camp together. If you served together, you leave a dime. A quarter is very significant because it means that you were there when that soldier was killed.

The meaning behind the tradition of leaving coins on veterans’ gravestones For those that have visited grave-sites of U.S. veterans, you may have noticed coins on the top of headstones that were left behind by previous visitors. A coin left on the headstone is a message to the deceased veteran’s family that someone has visited …

Military Headstone; If you leave a penny, it means you visited. A nickel means that you and the deceased soldier trained at boot camp together. If you served together, you leave a dime. A quarter is very significant because it means that you were there when that soldier was killed. Read More »

The youngest French resistance hero was a little boy who acted as a courier for resistance fighters, slipping past enemy patrols and carrying messages. In 1950, he was posthumously awarded the rank of sergeant of the resistance. He was Marcel Pinte, and he died for France at the age of 6.

France pays tribute to six-year-old resistance hero Marcel Pinte France has paid tribute to a six-year-old boy regarded as its youngest resistance hero, as part of the nationwide Armistice Day ceremonies in memory of those who died in the first and second world wars. In a special ceremony, the name of Marcel Pinte was inscribed …

The youngest French resistance hero was a little boy who acted as a courier for resistance fighters, slipping past enemy patrols and carrying messages. In 1950, he was posthumously awarded the rank of sergeant of the resistance. He was Marcel Pinte, and he died for France at the age of 6. Read More »

In 2017, a man in Texas purchased a working Sherman tank and parked it outside his house. After sending a “sternly worded letter” and realizing that they couldn’t tow the vehicle, the local HOA began issuing parking tickets on the tank. The owner left it there for two more weeks out of spite.

The Complete Story of the River Oaks Tank The tactical withdrawal of Tony Buzbee’s World War II-era Sherman M4A4 tank earlier this month brought the month-long Battle of River Oaks Boulevard to a close. After Buzbee—a trial lawyer, Marine veteran, and proud Aggie alum (and current A&M regent)—parked the fully operational tank on the street …

In 2017, a man in Texas purchased a working Sherman tank and parked it outside his house. After sending a “sternly worded letter” and realizing that they couldn’t tow the vehicle, the local HOA began issuing parking tickets on the tank. The owner left it there for two more weeks out of spite. Read More »

In 1714, 2 gunships fought for 14 hours, before one ran out of ammunition. The captain messaged his opponent, thanking him for a fine duel, and asking for more ammunition, so that the fight could continue. His opponent refused, but they then agreed to sail away in opposite directions.

When Scandinavia’s gutsiest Admiral ran out of ammo, he asked his enemy for more During the Romantic Age of Seafaring in the early 18 Century Peter Tordenskjold became the embodiment of naval heroism and derring-do. He was a daredevil combination of dashing warrior and gentleman adventurer whose exploits whilst serving in the Royal Dano-Norwegian Navy …

In 1714, 2 gunships fought for 14 hours, before one ran out of ammunition. The captain messaged his opponent, thanking him for a fine duel, and asking for more ammunition, so that the fight could continue. His opponent refused, but they then agreed to sail away in opposite directions. Read More »

Theodore Roosevelt’s youngest son Quentin Roosevelt I was a pilot in World War I and was killed in France during combat. He is the only child of a US President to die in combat

Quentin Roosevelt For this subject’s nephew and namesake, see Quentin Roosevelt II. Quentin Roosevelt I (November 19, 1897 – July 14, 1918) was the youngest son of President Theodore Roosevelt and First Lady Edith Roosevelt. Inspired by his father and siblings, he joined the United States Army Air Service where he became a pursuit pilot …

Theodore Roosevelt’s youngest son Quentin Roosevelt I was a pilot in World War I and was killed in France during combat. He is the only child of a US President to die in combat Read More »