Search Results for: chemical

Alexander Fleming’s mold could not produce penicillin fast enough for mass production; it wasn’t until 15 years later that lab worker ‘Mouldy’ Mary Hunt tested a moldy cantaloupe in a grocery store and discovered the strain that is used to produce all penicillin today

Mouldy Mary and the Cantaloupe It’s a well known story and example of medical serendipity. Alexander Fleming (1881-1955) a Scottish microbiologist who returned to his laboratory following his summer holiday and found his growth plates of Staphylococcal bacteria had been contaminated with mould. Wherever the mould was growing the bacterial cells had been killed. Antibiotics …

Alexander Fleming’s mold could not produce penicillin fast enough for mass production; it wasn’t until 15 years later that lab worker ‘Mouldy’ Mary Hunt tested a moldy cantaloupe in a grocery store and discovered the strain that is used to produce all penicillin today Read More »

A lab study found honeybee venom (which has the compound “melittin”) destroyed 2 types of hard to treat breast cancer cells. Melittin on its own reduced cancer cell growth & can be produced synthetically. One venom concentration killed cancer cells within 1 hour with minimal harm to other cells.

Honeybee venom ‘kills some breast cancer cells’ Getty Images Australian scientists say the venom from honeybees has been found to destroy aggressive breast cancer cells in a lab setting. The venom – and a compound in it called melittin – were used against two cancer types which are hard to treat: triple-negative and HER2-enriched. The …

A lab study found honeybee venom (which has the compound “melittin”) destroyed 2 types of hard to treat breast cancer cells. Melittin on its own reduced cancer cell growth & can be produced synthetically. One venom concentration killed cancer cells within 1 hour with minimal harm to other cells. Read More »

Irène Curie and her husband received a Nobel Prize for their discovery of artificial radioactivity, 30 years after Irène’s parents received their Nobel Prize. She died due to overexposure to radiation, also just like her parents. Her children are still alive and are also prominent scientists.

Irène Joliot-Curie Irène and Marie Curie in 1925 As she neared the end of her doctorate in 1924, Irène Curie was asked to teach the precision laboratory techniques required for radiochemical research to the young chemical engineer Frédéric Joliot, whom she would later wed. From 1928 Joliot-Curie and her husband Frédéric combined their research efforts …

Irène Curie and her husband received a Nobel Prize for their discovery of artificial radioactivity, 30 years after Irène’s parents received their Nobel Prize. She died due to overexposure to radiation, also just like her parents. Her children are still alive and are also prominent scientists. Read More »

30 years ago you had 15-17 minutes to escape a house fire. Nowadays you only have 3-5 minutes (due to more plastics & petroleum-based products in the house as well as more open floor plans, bigger rooms, & higher ceilings).

How Much Time Do You Have To Escape a House Fire? It’s Much Less Than You Think. The amount of time you have to escape a house fire has greatly decreased in the past few decades: 30 years ago you had about 15 to 17 minutes to escape a house fire. Today, you have about …

30 years ago you had 15-17 minutes to escape a house fire. Nowadays you only have 3-5 minutes (due to more plastics & petroleum-based products in the house as well as more open floor plans, bigger rooms, & higher ceilings). Read More »

Our brains do not necessarily process everything as that would be an overload of information, a study from 2016 found that under the influence of LSD, the brain recruited many more regions for visual processing than normal, enriching the images people saw even when their eyes were shut.

Study shows how LSD interferes with brain’s signalling A group of volunteers who took a trip in the name of science have helped researchers uncover how LSD messes with activity in the brain to induce an altered state of consciousness. Brain scans of individuals high on the drug revealed that the chemical allows parts of …

Our brains do not necessarily process everything as that would be an overload of information, a study from 2016 found that under the influence of LSD, the brain recruited many more regions for visual processing than normal, enriching the images people saw even when their eyes were shut. Read More »

Romans weaved asbestos fibers into a cloth-like material that was then sewn into tablecloths and napkins. These cloths were cleaned by throwing them into a blistering fire, from which they came out unharmed and whiter than when they went in.

History of Asbestos The fireproofing properties of asbestos made it essential to many industries such as the automobile, construction, manufacturing, power and chemical industries. The U.S. armed forces also used asbestos to prevent fires in every branch of the military. The primary intention of using asbestos was to protect workers, but many asbestos product manufacturers …

Romans weaved asbestos fibers into a cloth-like material that was then sewn into tablecloths and napkins. These cloths were cleaned by throwing them into a blistering fire, from which they came out unharmed and whiter than when they went in. Read More »

MIT has genetically modified trees to glow in the dark in the hopes of creating a literally green source of light for the future.

Engineers create plants that glow Imagine that instead of switching on a lamp when it gets dark, you could read by the light of a glowing plant on your desk. MIT engineers have taken a critical first step toward making that vision a reality. By embedding specialized nanoparticles into the leaves of a watercress plant, …

MIT has genetically modified trees to glow in the dark in the hopes of creating a literally green source of light for the future. Read More »

While both tea and coffee plants produce caffeine, this trait evolved independently – meaning caffeine production developed at least twice.

In the same way, it looks like caffeine actually evolved twice on the planet, once in tea and once in coffee. It’s thought that caffeine evolved in coffee to help protect the plant from predators, and it also helps with pollination. This suggests that the ability to make caffeine evolved at least twice, in the …

While both tea and coffee plants produce caffeine, this trait evolved independently – meaning caffeine production developed at least twice. Read More »