Search Results for: college

Alan Alda met his wife of over 60 years at a dinner party when they were the only two guests who ate the rum cake after it fell on the kitchen floor.

Alan Alda In 1956, while attending Fordham, Alda met Arlene Weiss, who was attending Hunter College. They bonded at a mutual friend’s dinner party; when a rum cake accidentally fell onto the kitchen floor, they were the only two guests who did not hesitate to eat it. A year after his graduation, on March 15, …

Alan Alda met his wife of over 60 years at a dinner party when they were the only two guests who ate the rum cake after it fell on the kitchen floor. Read More »

The Inka never developed writing but instead had a system of tying knots called khipu in which the color, direction and structure of the knots communicated different information. While most of it is numerical, fully cracking the code reveal a phonetic khipu alphabet with records of history.

The Inka Empire Recorded Their World In Knotted Cords Called Khipu Planet Earth The great South American civilization used complex knots and fibers for record-keeping and communication. More than 400 pendants hang from the primary cord of a khipu, an example of the complex record-keeping system used throughout the Inka Empire and beyond, even well …

The Inka never developed writing but instead had a system of tying knots called khipu in which the color, direction and structure of the knots communicated different information. While most of it is numerical, fully cracking the code reveal a phonetic khipu alphabet with records of history. Read More »

The last time a living Democratic president transferred the presidency to another Democrat was on March 4, 1857.

List of Presidents of the United States For the 1999 C-SPAN series, see American Presidents: Life Portraits. For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). The President of the United States is the head of state and head of government of the United States, indirectly elected to a four-year term by the people …

The last time a living Democratic president transferred the presidency to another Democrat was on March 4, 1857. Read More »

In the 1880s, the Harvard Observatory director was frustrated with his staff, and would say “My Scottish maid could do better!” So, he hired his Scottish maid. Williamina Fleming ran a team for decades, classified tens of thousands of stars, & discovered white dwarfs and the Horsehead Nebula.

Williamina Fleming Williamina Paton Stevens Fleming (May 15, 1857 – May 21, 1911) was a Scottish astronomer. During her career, she helped develop a common designation system for stars and cataloged thousands of stars and other astronomical phenomena. Among several career achievements that advanced astronomy, Fleming is noted for her discovery of the Horsehead Nebula …

In the 1880s, the Harvard Observatory director was frustrated with his staff, and would say “My Scottish maid could do better!” So, he hired his Scottish maid. Williamina Fleming ran a team for decades, classified tens of thousands of stars, & discovered white dwarfs and the Horsehead Nebula. Read More »

Marie Curie, the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, the first person to win twice, and the only person to win a Nobel Prize in two different sciences couldn’t legally attend college, so she did it illegally, going to what was known as the ‘Flying University’, a secret organization.

Marie Curie – Early Years Maria Skłodowska was born in Warsaw, in Congress Poland in the Russian Empire, on 7 November 1867, the fifth and youngest child of well-known teachers Bronisława, née Boguska, and Władysław Skłodowski. The elder siblings of Maria (nicknamed Mania) were Zofia (born 1862, nicknamed Zosia), Józef [pl] (born 1863, nicknamed Józio), Bronisława (born 1865, nicknamed Bronia) and Helena (born 1866, nicknamed Hela). On both the paternal and maternal sides, …

Marie Curie, the first woman to win a Nobel Prize, the first person to win twice, and the only person to win a Nobel Prize in two different sciences couldn’t legally attend college, so she did it illegally, going to what was known as the ‘Flying University’, a secret organization. Read More »

Theodore Roosevelt Jr was the oldest man in the D-Day invasion at 56. Initially denied to attend D-Day, Ted petitioned as he personally knew the men of these units and believed his presence would steady them. Despite arthritis and a heart condition, he stormed the beach with a cane and survived.

Theodore Roosevelt Jr. Theodore “Ted” Roosevelt III (September 13, 1887 – July 12, 1944), known as Theodore Roosevelt Jr.,[Note 1] was an American government, business, and military leader. He was the eldest son of President Theodore Roosevelt and First Lady Edith Roosevelt. Roosevelt is known for his World War II service, including the directing of …

Theodore Roosevelt Jr was the oldest man in the D-Day invasion at 56. Initially denied to attend D-Day, Ted petitioned as he personally knew the men of these units and believed his presence would steady them. Despite arthritis and a heart condition, he stormed the beach with a cane and survived. Read More »

Check out Karen Silkwood, a nuclear plant worker and whistleblower. On November 13, 1974, she set out to meet a reporter to go public with evidence of extensive safety violations. She was later found dead; her car appeared to have been run off the road and the documents she had with her were missing.

The Mysterious Death of Karen Silkwood What happened to the plutonium-plant worker turned union activist? On Nov. 13, 1974, union activist and plutonium-plant worker Karen Silkwood was found dead in what police ruled a single-car accident. But the circumstances surrounding her death have kept people guessing to this day. Silkwood was born Feb. 19, 1946, …

Check out Karen Silkwood, a nuclear plant worker and whistleblower. On November 13, 1974, she set out to meet a reporter to go public with evidence of extensive safety violations. She was later found dead; her car appeared to have been run off the road and the documents she had with her were missing. Read More »

In 1988, a man with OCD and extreme germophobia tried to commit suicide by shooting himself in the head with a rifle. However, he survived, and the bullet completely eliminated his mental disorder without causing any other damage to his brain.

Brain Wound Eliminates Man’s Mental Illness A mentally ill young man who shot himself in the head in a suicide attempt suffered a brain injury that apparently eliminated his phobia of germs and his obsession with washing his hands, doctors say. The .22-caliber slug destroyed the section of the brain responsible for his disabling obsessive-compulsive …

In 1988, a man with OCD and extreme germophobia tried to commit suicide by shooting himself in the head with a rifle. However, he survived, and the bullet completely eliminated his mental disorder without causing any other damage to his brain. Read More »

The Trollface meme creator registered the said meme in 2010. As of 2015, he has already earned a little over $100,000 in licensing fees, settlements, and other payouts.

The Maker Of The Trollface Meme Is Counting His Money You’re probably familiar with this image, the infamous “trollface” that’s circulated the Internet for years. Someone drew the original trollface, and it’s 24-year-old Carlos Ramirez. Back in 2008, Ramirez should have been working on a college paper, but as was the case on most nights, …

The Trollface meme creator registered the said meme in 2010. As of 2015, he has already earned a little over $100,000 in licensing fees, settlements, and other payouts. Read More »

Native Americans created a universal sign language that allowed 2/3 of all Indigenous tribes to communicate across most of North America, hundreds of years before Europeans invented a sign language of their own.

Plains Indian Sign Language Linguists work hard to try to save many languages from extinction, and one that has come close to that point is Plains Indian Sign Language or PISL. This was once one of the most widespread languages in the Americas, and its history predates most European variations of sign language. Today, less …

Native Americans created a universal sign language that allowed 2/3 of all Indigenous tribes to communicate across most of North America, hundreds of years before Europeans invented a sign language of their own. Read More »