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Socrates

Socrates Did Not Write Anything. All That is Known About Him Has Been Inferred from Accounts by Plato, Xenophon, and Aristotle.

Socrates was a well-known and controversial figure in his native Athens, so much so that he was frequently mocked in comic dramatists’ plays. But did you know that he never actually wrote anything? Socrates left no writings. Everything we know about him comes from accounts by members of his circle, primarily Plato and Xenophon, as …

Socrates Did Not Write Anything. All That is Known About Him Has Been Inferred from Accounts by Plato, Xenophon, and Aristotle. Read More »

Lysistrata

Lysistrata is an Ancient Greek Comedy Where Women Withheld Sex to End a War.

From the 6th century BCE, ancient Greek comedy was a popular and influential form of theater performed throughout ancient Greece. Aristophanes and Menander were the genre’s most famous playwrights, and their works, as well as those of their contemporaries, poked fun at politicians, philosophers, and fellow artists. But did you know there’s an ancient Greek …

Lysistrata is an Ancient Greek Comedy Where Women Withheld Sex to End a War. Read More »

Can You Still Visit the Site of the Battle of Thermopylae?

The Battle of Thermopylae was fought between the alliance of Ancient Greek city-states which was led by King Leonidas I of Sparta and the Achaemenid Empire of Xerxes. But did you know that the site where the battle was fought still exists? While you can still visit the Hot Gates of Thermopylae, a modern highway …

Can You Still Visit the Site of the Battle of Thermopylae? Read More »

In 427BC Athens sent a ship to Mytilene which had instructions to kill all adult men in the city-state. The next day, Athenians voted to change their decision – a second ship was dispatched. Racing through the night, it reached Mytilene just in time to prevent the massacre from happening.

Mytilenean Debate Allies in the Peloponnesian War. The Mytilenean Debate (also spelled “Mytilenaean Debate”) is the Athenian Assembly concerning reprisals against the city-state of Mytilene, which had attempted unsuccessfully to shake off Athenian hegemony during the Peloponnesian War. The Debate occurred in 427 B.C.; Thucydides reports it in book three of his History of the …

In 427BC Athens sent a ship to Mytilene which had instructions to kill all adult men in the city-state. The next day, Athenians voted to change their decision – a second ship was dispatched. Racing through the night, it reached Mytilene just in time to prevent the massacre from happening. Read More »