Mongol Empire

Genghis Khan would marry off a daughter to the king of an allied nation. Then he would assign his new son in law to military duty in the Mongol wars, while his daughter took over the rule. Most sons in law died in combat, giving his daughters complete control of these nations

Genghis Khan, Feminist The Secret History of the Mongol Queens: How the Daughters of Genghis Khan Rescued His Empire Crown Publishers (2010) Historian Jack Weatherford has conducted a single-handed rehabilitation of Genghis Khan. In an earlier book, he traced the conqueror’s impact on world history: one of the biggest and best-organized free-trade zones the world …

Genghis Khan would marry off a daughter to the king of an allied nation. Then he would assign his new son in law to military duty in the Mongol wars, while his daughter took over the rule. Most sons in law died in combat, giving his daughters complete control of these nations Read More »

Genghis Khan exempted the poor, teachers, artists, and lawyers from taxes, encouraged literacy, and established freedom of religion across his empire. He also forbade the selling of women and the hunting of animals during their breeding season.

Mongol Empire Not to be confused with Mughal Empire. The Mongol Empire (Mongolian: Mongolyn Ezent Güren listen ; Mongolian Cyrillic: Монголын эзэнт гүрэн; Mongolian pronunciation: [mɔŋɡ(ɔ)ɮˈiːŋ ɛt͡sˈɛnt ˈɡurəŋ]; also Орда, ‘the Horde’ in Russian chronicles) existed during the 13th and 14th centuries and was the largest contiguous land empire in history. Originating from Mongolia, the …

Genghis Khan exempted the poor, teachers, artists, and lawyers from taxes, encouraged literacy, and established freedom of religion across his empire. He also forbade the selling of women and the hunting of animals during their breeding season. Read More »