President of the United States

Einstein failing a math exam is a myth. He failed the entrance exam to Zurich Polytechnic because he did poorly on botany, zoology and language sections.

Did Einstein really fail math? In 1905, Theodore Roosevelt was inaugurated as the 26th president of the United States, Franklin D. Roosevelt married Eleanor and the World Series matched the New York Giants against the Philadelphia Athletics. And, for four glorious months, Albert Einstein authored four papers that changed our understanding of the way the …

Einstein failing a math exam is a myth. He failed the entrance exam to Zurich Polytechnic because he did poorly on botany, zoology and language sections. Read More »

George Washington died when his doctors tried to cure his epiglottitis (i.e. inflamed throat) with blood letting. He lost more than half his blood before they stopped the treatment, and died just hours later.

George Washington This article is about first president of the United States. For other uses, see George Washington (disambiguation). George Washington (February 22, 1732[b][c] – December 14, 1799) was an American political leader, military general, statesman, and Founding Father who also served as the first president of the United States from 1789 to 1797. He …

George Washington died when his doctors tried to cure his epiglottitis (i.e. inflamed throat) with blood letting. He lost more than half his blood before they stopped the treatment, and died just hours later. Read More »

The last time a living Democratic president transferred the presidency to another Democrat was on March 4, 1857.

List of Presidents of the United States For the 1999 C-SPAN series, see American Presidents: Life Portraits. For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). The President of the United States is the head of state and head of government of the United States, indirectly elected to a four-year term by the people …

The last time a living Democratic president transferred the presidency to another Democrat was on March 4, 1857. Read More »