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In 1888, Richard Mansfield played Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde in a stage production at a time when Jack the Ripper was murdering women. A theatre-goer wrote to the police accusing him of the murders because his stage transformation from a gentleman to mad killer was so convincing.

Richard Mansfield For the cricketer, see Richard Mansfield (cricketer). Richard Mansfield Richard Mansfield (24 May 1857 – 30 August 1907) was an English actor-manager best known for his performances in Shakespeare plays, Gilbert and Sullivan operas, and the play Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. Life and career Mansfield was born in Berlin and spent his …

In 1888, Richard Mansfield played Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde in a stage production at a time when Jack the Ripper was murdering women. A theatre-goer wrote to the police accusing him of the murders because his stage transformation from a gentleman to mad killer was so convincing. Read More »

During the reign of Tsar Peter the Great, it was customary for foreign dignitaries to drink from the “Cup of the White Eagle”, a chalice containing 1.5 litres of vodka – so many nations’ ambassadors travelled in pairs, with one official drinking the vodka, and the other discussing state issues

20 Facts About Your Favorite Liquors Jack Sparrow has his rum, Ron Burgundy has his scotch, and you probably have your own favorite liquor, too. But how much do you know about your beverage of choice from that magical shelf behind the bar? Whether you’re a whiskey connoisseur or just a gin enthusiast, it’s always …

During the reign of Tsar Peter the Great, it was customary for foreign dignitaries to drink from the “Cup of the White Eagle”, a chalice containing 1.5 litres of vodka – so many nations’ ambassadors travelled in pairs, with one official drinking the vodka, and the other discussing state issues Read More »

The Simpsons episode “Itchy and Scratchy Land,” was written in response to new, stringent censorship laws that were being put in place at the time. Fox had tried to prevent the inclusion of Itchy and Scratchy cartoons in the show, prompting the writers to make the episode as violent as possible.

Itchy & Scratchy Land This article is about the episode of The Simpsons. For the fictional theme park in The Simpsons, see Springfield (The Simpsons) § Itchy & Scratchy Land. “Itchy & Scratchy Land” is the fourth episode of The Simpsons’ sixth season. It first aired on the Fox network in the United States on …

The Simpsons episode “Itchy and Scratchy Land,” was written in response to new, stringent censorship laws that were being put in place at the time. Fox had tried to prevent the inclusion of Itchy and Scratchy cartoons in the show, prompting the writers to make the episode as violent as possible. Read More »

In 2006 VH1 ran a fundraiser for Hurricane Katrina where viewers who made donations were able to choose which music videos the station would play. One viewer donated $35,000 and requested continuous play of “99 Luftballons” and “99 Red Ballons” for an hour.

99 Luftballons The promotional video, which was originally made for the Dutch music programme TopPop and broadcast on 13 March 1983, was shot in a Dutch military training camp, the band performing the song on a stage in front of a backdrop of fires and explosions provided by the Dutch Army. Towards the end of …

In 2006 VH1 ran a fundraiser for Hurricane Katrina where viewers who made donations were able to choose which music videos the station would play. One viewer donated $35,000 and requested continuous play of “99 Luftballons” and “99 Red Ballons” for an hour. Read More »

Bowling was such a popular sport during the 1960s-1970s, top earning pros made twice as much money as NFL stars and other athletes. Today, even the very best bowlers usually have second jobs.

Is bowling in its final frames or will it roll on? Detroit Free Press DETROIT — In its heyday, Cloverlanes Bowl in Livonia was such a popular place to gather and throw balls that the weekend wait for a lane might be two — even three — hours long. “Oh my God, we thought we …

Bowling was such a popular sport during the 1960s-1970s, top earning pros made twice as much money as NFL stars and other athletes. Today, even the very best bowlers usually have second jobs. Read More »

With the exception of college or military service, 37 percent of Americans have never lived outside their hometown, and 57 percent of Americans have never lived outside their home state.

The Typical American Lives Only 18 Miles From Mom Families traveling from far-flung places, returning home for the holidays. That image of an American Christmas fits the perception of Americans as rootless, constantly on the move to seek opportunity even if it means leaving family behind. Yet that picture masks a key fact about the …

With the exception of college or military service, 37 percent of Americans have never lived outside their hometown, and 57 percent of Americans have never lived outside their home state. Read More »

The American College of Pediatricians is a group that links pedophilia to homosexuality and promotes “conversion” therapy. The name is intended to create confusion with the American Academy of Pediatrics, the professional association of pediatricians.

American College of Pediatricians This article is about a socially conservative advocacy group. For the major professional association of pediatricians, see American Academy of Pediatrics. The American College of Pediatricians (ACPeds) is a socially conservative advocacy group of pediatricians and other healthcare professionals in the United States. The group was founded in 2002 and claims …

The American College of Pediatricians is a group that links pedophilia to homosexuality and promotes “conversion” therapy. The name is intended to create confusion with the American Academy of Pediatrics, the professional association of pediatricians. Read More »

Meet “The Whole Shabangs” potato chips, available almost exclusively from US Prison system commissaries. Ex-cons consider these chips to be the best chip out there, and a high-point of their incarceration. Many end up dismayed and disappointed at their lack of availability “on the outside”.

The Popular Potato Chip Brand You Can Only Find in Prison The Whole Shabangs are the most popular potato chip you’ve never heard of. Produced by the Keefe Group specifically for America’s prison inmates, the potato chips aren’t sold in stores—they’re sold in prison commissaries. But the potato chips, which blend barbecue, salt and vinegar, …

Meet “The Whole Shabangs” potato chips, available almost exclusively from US Prison system commissaries. Ex-cons consider these chips to be the best chip out there, and a high-point of their incarceration. Many end up dismayed and disappointed at their lack of availability “on the outside”. Read More »

Meet Richard Feynman who taught himself trigonometry, advanced algebra, infinite series, analytic geometry, and both differential and integral calculus at the age of 15. Later he jokingly Cracked the Safes with Atomic Secrets at Los Alamos by trying numbers he thought a physicist might use.

Richard Feynman “Feynman” redirects here. For other uses, see Feynman (disambiguation). Richard Phillips Feynman (/ˈfaɪnmən/; May 11, 1918 – February 15, 1988) was an American theoretical physicist, known for his work in the path integral formulation of quantum mechanics, the theory of quantum electrodynamics, and the physics of the superfluidity of supercooled liquid helium, as …

Meet Richard Feynman who taught himself trigonometry, advanced algebra, infinite series, analytic geometry, and both differential and integral calculus at the age of 15. Later he jokingly Cracked the Safes with Atomic Secrets at Los Alamos by trying numbers he thought a physicist might use. Read More »

Patrick Reynolds, grandson of tobacco’s RJ Reynolds, is an anti-smoking advocate, operates an anti-smoking organization, and tours the world speaking out against smoking

Patrick Reynolds (activist) For other people named Patrick Reynolds, see Patrick Reynolds (disambiguation). Patrick Cleveland Reynolds (born December 2, 1948) is an American anti-smoking activist and former actor. Born in Miami Beach, Florida, he is the grandson of the tobacco company founder, R. J. Reynolds, and speaks of how he believes his family business has …

Patrick Reynolds, grandson of tobacco’s RJ Reynolds, is an anti-smoking advocate, operates an anti-smoking organization, and tours the world speaking out against smoking Read More »