“Weird Al” Yankovic

Weird Al wrote “The Saga Begins” before Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace came out. He gathered most of the information from online leaks, and was surprised at how accurate he was after seeing a charity pre-screen of the movie. He made minor alterations to the song after seeing it.

The Saga Begins “The Saga Begins” is a parody song by “Weird Al” Yankovic. It parodies “American Pie” by Don McLean, with lyrics that humorously summarize the plot of the film Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace through the point of view of Obi-Wan Kenobi, one of the protagonists of the film. The …

Weird Al wrote “The Saga Begins” before Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace came out. He gathered most of the information from online leaks, and was surprised at how accurate he was after seeing a charity pre-screen of the movie. He made minor alterations to the song after seeing it. Read More »

When Michael Jackson granted Weird Al Yankovic permission to do “Fat” (a parody of “Bad”), Jackson allowed him to use the same set built for his own “Badder” video from the Moonwalker film. Yankovic said that Jackson’s support helped to gain approval from other artists he wanted to parody.

Alfred Matthew “Weird Al” Yankovic (/ˈjæŋkəvɪk/ YANG-kə-vik;[1] born October 23, 1959)[2] is an American singer-songwriter, record producer, satirist, film producer, and author. Since his first-aired comedy song in 1976, he has sold more than 12 million albums (as of 2007),[3] recorded more than 150 parody and original songs,[4][5][6] and performed more than 1,000 live shows.[7] …

When Michael Jackson granted Weird Al Yankovic permission to do “Fat” (a parody of “Bad”), Jackson allowed him to use the same set built for his own “Badder” video from the Moonwalker film. Yankovic said that Jackson’s support helped to gain approval from other artists he wanted to parody. Read More »

Mark Knopfler agreed to allow Weird Al to parody “Money For Nothing” on the condition that Knopfler play the lead guitar on the track to add “authenticity.”

Despite his brief screen time as an accident-prone shop teacher, lanky falsetto comedian Emo Philips still receives residual checks from the Screen Actors Guild for his role in UHF. Although played by a non-speaking extra in the film, the booth worker role was set to be played by Rambo himself, Sylvester Stallone, who agreed to …

Mark Knopfler agreed to allow Weird Al to parody “Money For Nothing” on the condition that Knopfler play the lead guitar on the track to add “authenticity.” Read More »