Although they failed to find missing pilot Steve Fossett for years, in the days following his disappearance, they DID find EIGHT other previously unidentified crash sites.

Steve Fossett

Disappearance and search

Champion 8KCAB Super Decathlon

At 8:45 a.m. on the morning of Monday, September 3, 2007 (Labor Day), Fossett took off in a single-engine Super Decathlon light aircraft from the Flying-M Ranch private airstrip, near Smith Valley, Nevada. When he failed to return, searches were launched about six hours later. There was no signal from the plane’s emergency locator transmitter (ELT) designed to be automatically activated in the event of a crash, but it was of an older type notorious for failing to operate after a crash.

It was first thought that Fossett may have also been wearing a Breitling Emergency watch with a manually operated ELT that had a range of up to 90 miles (140 km), but no signal was recei… Continue Reading (9 minute read)

8 thoughts on “Although they failed to find missing pilot Steve Fossett for years, in the days following his disappearance, they DID find EIGHT other previously unidentified crash sites.”

  1. monkeyputz

    I remember that! He and Richard Branson had just circumnavigated the globe at some insane altitude and lived to tell about it. His name was well-known and then pooof.

  2. jesushoofes

    What’s wild to me is that the state was considering billing his widow for the search. In the end they decided to ask politely for 487 000 usd, which she declined after she already spend 1 million searching for him through private means.

  3. TacTurtle

    So… if your friend goes missing in a small plane and they won’t search for him, convince an eccentric billionaire to disappear in his plane for a couple days in the same area?

  4. Mammoth-Crow

    My uncle found a long lost WW2 plane and everything was untouched since the crash. Literally just used the library and satellite images, got dropped off deep in the woods and found it within a day.

  5. Darryl_Lict

    Lots of really rugged terrain not close to anything in the Sierra Nevadas.

  6. invisiverse

    Look up the Nevada Triangle. 2,000 missing planes in this area in 60 years and most of them have never been found. Nevada is extremely remote, full of more mountain ranges than any other state, and extremely sparsely populated (about 78% of the state’s population is in Clark County, where Las Vegas is).

  7. ca_fighterace

    I flew over the proximity of his crash site same day he disappeared coming back from Colorado to California in a Kingair 200. I always monitor 121.5 at altitude but I had hoped to get that ATIS at Modesto as I passed the Mono Lake area before I started descending and had switched my number 2 comm at some point before that. I will forever wonder if I had waited a bit longer I might have picked up the ELT and reported it. The story could have been so different.

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