Eight years after JFK’s assassination, Jackie Kennedy avoided the public unveiling of their White House portraits, but the Nixons graciously agreed to a secret, private tour for her and her kids. It was her only return visit.

A Secret Visit

“I wanted to let future generations know the man for what he was, a metaphor of America at a crossroads, not just handsome Jack.”- Aaron Shikler1

On November 22, 1963, President John F. Kennedy’s life was tragically cut short in Dallas, Texas. A state funeral was quickly planned and the nation grieved for its commander in chief while the Kennedy family mourned the loss of a father and husband. After the funeral, Jacqueline Kennedy made plans to quickly move her family out of the White House to make way for President Lyndon Johnson and his family. On December 6, 1963, two weeks after the president’s death, the Kennedys departed the White House.2

During the rest of her lifetime Jacqueline Kennedy returned to the White House only once…. Continue Reading (7 minute read)

5 thoughts on “Eight years after JFK’s assassination, Jackie Kennedy avoided the public unveiling of their White House portraits, but the Nixons graciously agreed to a secret, private tour for her and her kids. It was her only return visit.”

  1. TheDeadlySquid

    I imagine it would have been a very painful experience and no need to have the press involved. She literally had a front row seat to her husband’s head being blown apart.

  2. Graf_Geilsberg

    Well, Nixon believed his whole life, that LBJ was the mastermind behind JFKs assassination. He also worked with Kennedy when the two were both young first term congressmen.

  3. Sleepy_pirate

    No matter the political differences I’ve always liked seeing how the current president and the former presidents all like each other and treat their families as their own.

  4. Thompson_S_Sweetback

    I got teary eyed reading this article. There’s something about the raw pain and emotion being expressed in handwritten letters, plus the old-fashioned civility of two families from different political parties being kind to each other.

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