A 75-year Harvard study found close relationships are the key to a person’s success. Having someone to lean on keeps brain function high and reduces emotional, and physical, pain. People who feel lonely are more likely to experience health declines earlier in life.

75-year Harvard study reveals the key to success in 2017 and beyond

If you’re looking for a science-backed way to make 2017 a happy new year, there are other options besides reluctantly dragging yourself to the gym or thinking, “What should I change about myself?”

A recent Harvard study, which examines almost a century’s worth of data, reveals a simple way to be happier and more successful next year: Spend more time with people who make you happy.

Harvard’s Grant & Glueck study tracked the physical and emotional well-being of 268 male graduates from Harvard, as well as 456 poor men growing up in Boston from 1939 to 2014. Multiple generations of researchers analyzed brain scans, blood samples, self-reported surveys and interactions of these men to compile their findings.

The conclusions are simpl… Continue Reading (2 minute read)

12 thoughts on “A 75-year Harvard study found close relationships are the key to a person’s success. Having someone to lean on keeps brain function high and reduces emotional, and physical, pain. People who feel lonely are more likely to experience health declines earlier in life.”

  1. hekatonkhairez

    I learned this the hard way. Friendships are so important in keeping sane. Being alone, especially during much of my undergrad lead to a ton of mental health issues that I’m still grappling with. With a proper friendgroup those issues aren’t as bad.

  2. sureyouken

    Remember physically materially close is not the same as being close. You can live with someone for 13 years only to find out they’ve felt alone the whole time.

  3. enthusiasticaf

    I’m under 30 y.o., not a doctor, and only have my personal experience to go by but…. my health has rapidly declined in the past year. It’s a lot of issues all causing each other but IMO loneliness and depression have been the catalysts for most of it. I live alone, work from home, and can count on my fingers the number of times I’ve seen other people during the pat year and it’s really taking a toll I did not expect. I thought I was managing well enough until I hit a wall. I think my story will not be uncommon as we start to see the long term effects of this pandemic.

  4. IsItTheFrankOrBeans

    I’m doomed then.

  5. cantstandya1234

    No wonder I feel like I’m 67 when I’m a actually 37 lol

  6. noob_lvl1

    I’ve also found that close relationships is just good for opportunities as well. The more you have the bigger variety of people there are in your life that can help you or give you advice on something.

  7. Al-Anda

    Is there a study for people who’ve worked in the service industry for so long and suffered at the hands of guests that they are now actually happier when completely alone? I’ve got a test subject for them.

  8. blitherblather425

    I don’t like hearing this because I am all alone. Someone else posted something about how you don’t live as long if you are lonely. I’m nothing but lonely.

  9. A_Bleeding_Corpse

    I’m 35, have cancer, had a heart attack 2 months ago, neck deep in medical debt, I have one actual close friend who I only see once in 4 months, I’m unemployed and depressed 24/7. I’m alone in a room 90% of my life in the past year.

    Yeah, this study seems accurate.

  10. buckyhermit

    Insert Ralph Wiggum “I’m in danger” meme here.

  11. Mukagas

    The game was rigged from the start, wasn’t it?

  12. ShriekingMuppet

    Pretty much have spent most of my time since I moved to a new city miserable since I have no friends here. Has definitely taken a toll on my health both physically and mentally.

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