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Agriculture & Forestry

Why Did The United States Start Planting Kudzu in the South?

An invasive species can be described as any organism that causes ecological harm in a new environment where it does not naturally come from. They have been known to cause the extinction of both plants and animals by competing with resources and reducing biodiversity. Did you know the story of the Kudzu plant that was …

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What is Kangatarianism?

We’re all familiar with vegans, vegetarians, and pescetarians, but have you ever heard of kangatarians? The concept of Kangatarians became widespread in a Sydney Morning Herald article and its mention in the Love Island Australian dating show.  Kangatarianism is eating a vegetarian diet while still consuming kangaroo meat. Many kangatarians justify that it is a …

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Why Are Barns Red?

When we were kids, we’d always remember a big red barn in stories and books. But did you know how the classic red barn came to be? Back in the day, farmers would paint their barns with linseed oil and rust to protect it from fungi and moss. The combination of the two ingredients created …

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Male bovines are called “bulls,” until they’re castrated-then they’re called “steers.” Female bovines are called “heifers” until they have a calf, then they’re known as “cows.”

How to determine if cattle are bulls, steers, cows or heifers If you’re new to the cattle world, keeping bulls, steers, cows and heifers straight is confusing. Even though you once thought that “cow” was a blanket term used for all cattle in all situations, you’ll catch on quickly to the correct terminology. Bulls A …

Male bovines are called “bulls,” until they’re castrated-then they’re called “steers.” Female bovines are called “heifers” until they have a calf, then they’re known as “cows.” Read More »

Biologist Tyrone Hayes published an experiment that showed pesticide Atrazine was turning frogs from male to female. In response, manufacturer Syngenta spent years spying on him and conducting an extensive campaign to create a scandal that would end his career.

A Valuable Reputation In 2001, seven years after joining the biology faculty of the University of California, Berkeley, Tyrone Hayes stopped talking about his research with people he didn’t trust. He instructed the students in his lab, where he was raising three thousand frogs, to hang up the phone if they heard a click, a …

Biologist Tyrone Hayes published an experiment that showed pesticide Atrazine was turning frogs from male to female. In response, manufacturer Syngenta spent years spying on him and conducting an extensive campaign to create a scandal that would end his career. Read More »