Home » Business & Industrial » Transportation & Logistics

Transportation & Logistics

There are 2 billion parking spots in the U.S. for about 200 million cars. The area of parking per car in the United States is thus larger than the area of housing per human.

Cars Make Your Life More Expensive, Even If You Don’t Have One In Gastown, one of Vancouver’s priciest and most popular downtown neighbourhoods, there’s a seven-storey parking garage that Janice Abbott said sits two-thirds empty on weekday afternoons. For nearly four years, Abbott, the CEO of Atira Women’s Resource Society, has lobbied to turn the …

There are 2 billion parking spots in the U.S. for about 200 million cars. The area of parking per car in the United States is thus larger than the area of housing per human. Read More »

The reason that some semi-truck trailer doors have quilted patterns on their rear doors is to reduce glare on the vehicles following them.

This Is Why Truck Trailers Have Quilted Rear Doors: A Brief Explainer Semi trucks and their trailers are our stalwart friends on any road trip. Those who spend a lot of time driving can attest that the highway is the natural habitat of these hulking machines. But even if we see them all the time, …

The reason that some semi-truck trailer doors have quilted patterns on their rear doors is to reduce glare on the vehicles following them. Read More »

Early sections of San Francisco were built upon ships abandoned by prospectors during the California Gold Rush. Many were intentionally run aground to become bars and hotels. Now, hundreds of wooden ships lay beneath the city streets and a portion of their subway goes through the hull of one.

San Francisco’s Foundation is Built on Old Ships from the Mid-1800s In 1994, construction workers in San Francisco’s financial district began digging to build a new light-rail tunnel beneath the city when they hit something. It was a massive ship named “the Rome.” The ship was so large that the crew had to tunnel through …

Early sections of San Francisco were built upon ships abandoned by prospectors during the California Gold Rush. Many were intentionally run aground to become bars and hotels. Now, hundreds of wooden ships lay beneath the city streets and a portion of their subway goes through the hull of one. Read More »

In order to get improvements in their job security amidst the emergence of a rival bus line, bus drivers in Okayama, Japan decided to go on strike in a unique way in 2018. While on strike, they supported the community by continuing to drive their routes, but simply not charging customers.

Okayama buses strike by continuing to run and refusing to take anyone’s money Bus drivers in Okayama working with Ryobi Group have taken to the streets in an unusual form of protest. While technically on strike, they are continuing to drive their routes while refusing to take fares from passengers. ▼ Image shows a white …

In order to get improvements in their job security amidst the emergence of a rival bus line, bus drivers in Okayama, Japan decided to go on strike in a unique way in 2018. While on strike, they supported the community by continuing to drive their routes, but simply not charging customers. Read More »

In 1986, two Russian airline pilots got into an argument over wether one could land the plane without vision. The main pilot pulled the curtains over the windows, insisting he could. Then, the plane missed the runway, flipped and killed 70 of the passengers

Aeroflot Flight 6502 Aeroflot Flight 6502 was a Soviet domestic passenger flight operated by a Tupolev Tu-134A from Sverdlovsk (now Yekaterinburg) to Grozny, which crashed on 20 October 1986. 70 of the 94 passengers and crew on board were killed. Investigators determined the cause of the accident to be pilot negligence. Background The crew of …

In 1986, two Russian airline pilots got into an argument over wether one could land the plane without vision. The main pilot pulled the curtains over the windows, insisting he could. Then, the plane missed the runway, flipped and killed 70 of the passengers Read More »

Air traffic controllers get a break every 2 hours. When controllers remain “on position” for more than 2 hours without a break, performance can deteriorate rapidly, even at low traffic levels.

Air traffic controller Many countries regulate work hours to ensure that controllers are able to remain focused and effective. Research has shown that when controllers remain “on position” for more than two hours without a break, performance can deteriorate rapidly, even at low traffic levels. Many national regulations therefore require breaks at least every two …

Air traffic controllers get a break every 2 hours. When controllers remain “on position” for more than 2 hours without a break, performance can deteriorate rapidly, even at low traffic levels. Read More »

In 1970, a fighter pilot was forced to eject during a training mission. His plane, however, righted itself and continued flying for miles, finally touching down gently in a farmer’s field. It earned the nickname “The Cornfield Bomber.”

Cornfield Bomber The “Cornfield Bomber” was the nickname given to a Convair F-106 Delta Dart, operated by the 71st Fighter-Interceptor Squadron of the United States Air Force. In 1970, during a training exercise, it made an unpiloted landing in a farmer’s field in Montana, suffering only minor damage, after the pilot had ejected from the …

In 1970, a fighter pilot was forced to eject during a training mission. His plane, however, righted itself and continued flying for miles, finally touching down gently in a farmer’s field. It earned the nickname “The Cornfield Bomber.” Read More »

The average delay of a Japanese bullet train is just 54 seconds, despite factors such as natural disasters. If the train is more than five minutes late, passengers are issued with a certificate that they can show their boss to show that they are late.

Reality Check: When is a train on time? A Japanese railway company made headlines after it apologised for sending a train off 20 seconds early. The idea of “deeply apologising” for the “severe inconvenience” of a lost 20 seconds seemed almost alien to commuters who have to put up with much greater disruption in other …

The average delay of a Japanese bullet train is just 54 seconds, despite factors such as natural disasters. If the train is more than five minutes late, passengers are issued with a certificate that they can show their boss to show that they are late. Read More »