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The Liberator. A $2.10, single-shot (no magazine) pistol; It was shipped with 10 rounds and an instruction sheet in comic strip air-dropped on Axis-occupied lands; A resistance fighter was to sneak up on an Axis occupier, kill or incapacitate him using the gun, and retrieve his weapons.

FP-45 Liberator For the 3D printed pistol, see Liberator (gun). For the shotgun, see Winchester Liberator. The FP-45 Liberator is a pistol manufactured by the United States military during World War II for use by resistance forces in occupied territories. The Liberator was never issued to American or other Allied troops, and there are few …

The Liberator. A $2.10, single-shot (no magazine) pistol; It was shipped with 10 rounds and an instruction sheet in comic strip air-dropped on Axis-occupied lands; A resistance fighter was to sneak up on an Axis occupier, kill or incapacitate him using the gun, and retrieve his weapons. Read More »

During the attack on Pearl Harbor, only 5 American pilots managed to get into the air against 353 Japanese planes, the first two were George Welch and Kenneth Taylor. They shot down 6 enemies. They were DENIED the Medal of Honor because … they didn’t have permission to take off from their CO.

American Aviators Aloft at Pearl Harbor Two heroic American aviators led a spirited defense against the Japanese at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941. The gallant sortie of the battleship USS Nevada was only one example of the many acts of heroism that occurred at Pearl Harbor on Sunday, December 7, 1941. A handful of …

During the attack on Pearl Harbor, only 5 American pilots managed to get into the air against 353 Japanese planes, the first two were George Welch and Kenneth Taylor. They shot down 6 enemies. They were DENIED the Medal of Honor because … they didn’t have permission to take off from their CO. Read More »

In 1956, a fighter plane shot itself down because it was faster than the bullet it shot

The Fighter Plane That Shot Itself Down In 1956, the Grumman aircraft corporation was testing its new fighter, the F-11 Tiger, off the coast of New York state. The pilot fired a long burst from its guns and moments later suffered mysterious, catastrophic damage that caved in the windshield and mortally wounded the engine. What …

In 1956, a fighter plane shot itself down because it was faster than the bullet it shot Read More »

At an Allied checkpoint during the Battle of the Bulge, US General Omar Bradley was detained as a possible spy when he correctly identified Springfield as the capital of Illinois. The American military police officer who questioned him mistakenly believed the capital was Chicago

Battle of the Bulge This article is about the 1944 German offensive in World War II. For other uses, see Battle of the Bulge (disambiguation). Not to be confused with the 1940 German Army Group A Ardennes offensive in the Battle of France. Map showing the swelling of “the Bulge” as the German offensive progressed …

At an Allied checkpoint during the Battle of the Bulge, US General Omar Bradley was detained as a possible spy when he correctly identified Springfield as the capital of Illinois. The American military police officer who questioned him mistakenly believed the capital was Chicago Read More »

During the American Civil War, several divisions of the confederate army had a large snowball fight. It started when a couple of hundred men from Texas plotted a friendly fight with men from Arkansas, which spiralled into a brawl involving 9,000 soldiers of the Army of Northern Virginia.

Snowball fight During the American Civil War, on January 29, 1863, the largest military snow exchange occurred in the Rappahannock Valley in Northern Virginia. What began as a few hundred men from Texas plotting a friendly fight against their Arkansas camp mates soon escalated into a brawl that involved 9,000 soldiers of the Army of …

During the American Civil War, several divisions of the confederate army had a large snowball fight. It started when a couple of hundred men from Texas plotted a friendly fight with men from Arkansas, which spiralled into a brawl involving 9,000 soldiers of the Army of Northern Virginia. Read More »

At an Allied checkpoint during the Battle of the Bulge, US General Omar Bradley was detained as a possible spy when he correctly identified Springfield as the capital of Illinois. The American military police officer who questioned him mistakenly believed the capital was Chicago

Battle of the Bulge This article is about the 1944 German offensive in World War II. For other uses, see Battle of the Bulge (disambiguation). Not to be confused with the 1940 German Army Group A Ardennes offensive in the Battle of France. Map showing the swelling of “the Bulge” as the German offensive progressed …

At an Allied checkpoint during the Battle of the Bulge, US General Omar Bradley was detained as a possible spy when he correctly identified Springfield as the capital of Illinois. The American military police officer who questioned him mistakenly believed the capital was Chicago Read More »

French cavalry captured a Dutch warship fleet trapped in ice in 1795, “The only time in history that men on horseback captured a fleet of ships”.

The Only Time in History When Men on Horseback Captured a Fleet of Ships The French Revolutionary Wars lasted a decade, but their strangest moment may have lasted just a few days. The Battle of Texel remains the only instance in history where a cavalry troop — horse-riding soldiers — captured a fleet of ships. …

French cavalry captured a Dutch warship fleet trapped in ice in 1795, “The only time in history that men on horseback captured a fleet of ships”. Read More »

5 men volunteered to stand directly under a Nuclear Blast in 1959, with a sixth man who didn’t volunteer. None suffered immediate harm, but all later developed cancer.

The Day Five Men Willingly Stood Under a Nuclear Explosion This content is imported from YouTube. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site. In the 1950s, fear of nuclear-armed Soviet bombers led to the creation of the …

5 men volunteered to stand directly under a Nuclear Blast in 1959, with a sixth man who didn’t volunteer. None suffered immediate harm, but all later developed cancer. Read More »

In 1932 Admiral Harry E. Yarnell launched a simulated carrier attack on Pearl Harbour, in almost exactly the same way as the actual Japanese attack 10 years later. Declared a total success by umpires, Yarnell warned of the vulnerability. Naval Intelligence knew Japanese writers reported on it.

Harry E. Yarnell Admiral Harry Ervin Yarnell (18 October 1875 – 7 July 1959) was an American naval officer whose career spanned over 51 years and three wars, from the Spanish–American War through World War II. Among his achievements was proving, in 1932 war games, that Pearl Harbor was vulnerable to a naval aerial attack. …

In 1932 Admiral Harry E. Yarnell launched a simulated carrier attack on Pearl Harbour, in almost exactly the same way as the actual Japanese attack 10 years later. Declared a total success by umpires, Yarnell warned of the vulnerability. Naval Intelligence knew Japanese writers reported on it. Read More »

During WW1, Australian Soldiers at the Second Battle of Villers-Bretonneux managed to steal a German tank as a trophy and transport it to Australia. Today it stands as the only surviving A7V Sturmpanzerwagen.

Mephisto (tank) Mephisto after recovery from the battlefield. Jun 14, 1919, Mephisto Tank unloads off the SS Armagh at Brisbane Mephisto Tank lands at Brisbane “Mephisto” on display in the Australian War Memorial, July 2015. Mephisto is a World War I German tank, the only surviving example of an A7V. In April 1918, during a …

During WW1, Australian Soldiers at the Second Battle of Villers-Bretonneux managed to steal a German tank as a trophy and transport it to Australia. Today it stands as the only surviving A7V Sturmpanzerwagen. Read More »