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Each year, 22,000 tons of dust from the Sahara Desert is carried by air currents to the Amazon Rainforest where it is an important source of phosphorus for tropical plants

NASA Satellite Reveals How Much Saharan Dust Feeds Amazon’s Plants What connects Earth’s largest, hottest desert to its largest tropical rain forest? The Sahara Desert is a near-uninterrupted brown band of sand and scrub across the northern third of Africa. The Amazon rain forest is a dense green mass of humid jungle that covers northeast …

Each year, 22,000 tons of dust from the Sahara Desert is carried by air currents to the Amazon Rainforest where it is an important source of phosphorus for tropical plants Read More »

NASA’s longest serving female employee since January 1958, Sue Finley, has been an engineer and programmer for space missions since Explorer 1, for missions to the Moon, Sun, all the planets and many other solar system bodies, and recipient of NASA’s Exceptional Public Service Medal.

Susan G. Finley Susan G. Finley, a native Californian, has been an employee of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) since January 1958, making her the longest-serving woman in NASA. Two days before Explorer 1 was launched, Finley began her career with the laboratory as a human computer, calculating rocket launch trajectories by hand. She now …

NASA’s longest serving female employee since January 1958, Sue Finley, has been an engineer and programmer for space missions since Explorer 1, for missions to the Moon, Sun, all the planets and many other solar system bodies, and recipient of NASA’s Exceptional Public Service Medal. Read More »

In 1969, at the height of the Cold War, the Apollo 11 crew carried commemorative medals to the moon to honor two Soviet cosmonauts who died as part of the USSR’s human spaceflight program

Statement About Honoring American and Russian Space Heroes During the Apollo 11 Mission THE TWO MEN we hope will set foot on the moon represent all mankind. Their achievement will be the world’s achievement. It is fitting, therefore, that the first lunar explorers carry with them some recognition of the sacrifice made by other space …

In 1969, at the height of the Cold War, the Apollo 11 crew carried commemorative medals to the moon to honor two Soviet cosmonauts who died as part of the USSR’s human spaceflight program Read More »

When the replacement crew for Skylab entered the empty space station, they found that it wasn’t empty at all: 3 figures were inside. Upon further inspection, the replacement crew found out that these were dummies placed in flight suits by the previous Skylab crew before they left.

Skylab 4 Skylab 4 (also SL-4 and SLM-3) was the third crewed Skylab mission and placed the third and final crew aboard the first American space station. The mission started on November 16, 1973 with the launch of three astronauts on an Apollo command and service module on a Saturn IB rocket from the Kennedy …

When the replacement crew for Skylab entered the empty space station, they found that it wasn’t empty at all: 3 figures were inside. Upon further inspection, the replacement crew found out that these were dummies placed in flight suits by the previous Skylab crew before they left. Read More »

When NASA used electronic computers for the first time – to calculate John Glenn’s orbit around Earth – officials called on Katherine Johnson to verify the computer’s numbers; Glenn had asked for her specifically and had refused to fly unless Johnson verified the calculations.

Katherine Johnson: Hidden Figures Nasa mathematician dies at 101 Reuters Pioneering African-American Nasa mathematician Katherine Johnson has died at the age of 101. Nasa announced her death on Twitter, saying it was celebrating her life and honouring “her legacy of excellence that broke down racial and social barriers”. Ms Johnson calculated rocket trajectories and Earth …

When NASA used electronic computers for the first time – to calculate John Glenn’s orbit around Earth – officials called on Katherine Johnson to verify the computer’s numbers; Glenn had asked for her specifically and had refused to fly unless Johnson verified the calculations. Read More »

The common method for a spacecraft to shift between two orbits is called a Hohmann Transfer, and that the guy who calculated it (in 1925) was inspired by a science fiction book written in 1897, which gave a generally correct explanation of the concept of orbit trajectory

Hohmann transfer orbit Hohmann transfer orbit, labelled 2, from an orbit (1) to a higher orbit (3) An example of a Hohmann transfer orbit between Earth and Mars, as used by the NASA InSight probe. Hohman · Earth · Mars In orbital mechanics, the Hohmann transfer orbit (/ˈhoʊmən/) is an elliptical orbit used to transfer …

The common method for a spacecraft to shift between two orbits is called a Hohmann Transfer, and that the guy who calculated it (in 1925) was inspired by a science fiction book written in 1897, which gave a generally correct explanation of the concept of orbit trajectory Read More »

The Sweden Solar System is the world’s largest scale model of the Solar System at a scale of 1:20 million. In Sweden, the Sun is represented by the Globe Arena in Stockholm which is the largest spherical building in the world and the planets are located in different locations of Sweden.

Sweden Solar System The Sweden Solar System is the world’s largest model of our planetary system, at a scale of 1:20 million. The sun is represented by the Globe Arena in Stockholm, the largest spherical building in the world. The planets, all appropriately scaled, are all around Stockholm and its suburbs. Jupiter (diameter 7.3 m) …

The Sweden Solar System is the world’s largest scale model of the Solar System at a scale of 1:20 million. In Sweden, the Sun is represented by the Globe Arena in Stockholm which is the largest spherical building in the world and the planets are located in different locations of Sweden. Read More »

After landing on the moon during Apollo 11, Buzz Aldrin accidentally damaged the circuit breaker that would arm the ascent engine that would get them off the moon. The astronauts activated the engine by triggering the circuit with a felt-tipped pen.

Apollo 11 This article is about the 1969 crewed lunar mission. For other uses, see Apollo 11 (disambiguation). Apollo 11 was the spaceflight that first landed humans on the Moon. Commander Neil Armstrong and lunar module pilot Buzz Aldrin formed the American crew that landed the Apollo Lunar Module Eagle on July 20, 1969, at …

After landing on the moon during Apollo 11, Buzz Aldrin accidentally damaged the circuit breaker that would arm the ascent engine that would get them off the moon. The astronauts activated the engine by triggering the circuit with a felt-tipped pen. Read More »

Astronomer Harlow Shapley firmly believed that there was only one galaxy in the universe but when he was presented with an evidence that disproved his view, he said “it destroyed his universe.” Then he completely changed his view and devoted his subsequent career in mapping 76,000 galaxies.

Harlow Shapley Harlow Shapley (November 2, 1885 – October 20, 1972) was an American scientist, head of the Harvard College Observatory (1921–1952), and political activist during the latter New Deal and Fair Deal. Shapley used Cepheid variable stars to estimate the size of the Milky Way Galaxy and the Sun’s position within it by using …

Astronomer Harlow Shapley firmly believed that there was only one galaxy in the universe but when he was presented with an evidence that disproved his view, he said “it destroyed his universe.” Then he completely changed his view and devoted his subsequent career in mapping 76,000 galaxies. Read More »

Eratosthenes, a Greek mathematician and astronomer (276 BC), measured of Earth’s circumference by using the shadow angles from the sun in two locations. He calculated it was 39,375 km, which is 1.4% less than the real number of 40,076 km

Eratosthenes This article is about the Greek scholar of the third century BC. For the crater named after him, see Eratosthenes (crater). For the ancient Athenian statesman of the fifth century BC, see Eratosthenes (statesman). Eratosthenes of Cyrene (/ɛrəˈtɒsθəniːz/; Greek: Ἐρατοσθένης ὁ Κυρηναῖος, romanized: Eratosthénēs ho Kurēnaĩos, IPA: [eratostʰénɛːs]; c. 276 BC[note 1] – c. …

Eratosthenes, a Greek mathematician and astronomer (276 BC), measured of Earth’s circumference by using the shadow angles from the sun in two locations. He calculated it was 39,375 km, which is 1.4% less than the real number of 40,076 km Read More »