Harriet Tubman escaped slavery in the southerns states, then returned again and again to rescue 70 more enslaved people. Then later, after the Fugitive Slave Act was passed, she helped guide fugitives farther north into Canada. During the American Civil War she helped the Union Army.

Harriet Tubman

This article is about the person. For the musical group called Harriet Tubman, see Harriet Tubman (band).

Harriet Tubman (born Araminta Ross, c. March 1822 – March 10, 1913) was an American abolitionist and political activist. Born into slavery, Tubman escaped and subsequently made some 13 missions to rescue approximately 70 enslaved people, including family and friends, using the network of antislavery activists and safe houses known as the Underground Railroad. During the American Civil War, she served as an armed scout and spy for the Union Army. In her later years, Tubman was an activist in the movement for women’s suffrage.

Born enslaved in Dorchester County, Maryland, Tubman was beaten and whipped by her various masters as a c… Continue Reading (38 minute read)

10 thoughts on “Harriet Tubman escaped slavery in the southerns states, then returned again and again to rescue 70 more enslaved people. Then later, after the Fugitive Slave Act was passed, she helped guide fugitives farther north into Canada. During the American Civil War she helped the Union Army.”

  1. 80poundnuts

    “Helped” the union is a massive understatement. She ran the largest covert sabatoge effort for the Union during the entire war

  2. Lecterr

    Imagine escaping slavery and then having the balls to go back to help others. Better person than me, that’s for sure, I would’ve been long gone.

  3. ElfMage83

    I don’t believe you just learned this today.

  4. bruyeres

    You never heard of the underground railroad until today?

  5. Curtis

    Our family had a house growing up that was used for the Underground Railroad, dirt floor in the basement and shelf’s where they use to sleep. I always wondered if she used our house.

  6. gitarzan

    That’s what a hero is folks.

  7. Utterlybored

    If that doesn’t warrant taking Andrew Jackson’s place on the $20 bill, what does?

  8. hblask

    There was a movie “Harriet” out last year (?) that told this story. It was quite good.

    As a side note, the closing theme (“Stand Up”) was nominated for best song at the Academy Awards and should’ve won by a mile but inexplicably lost to some random boring Elton John song.

  9. lorealweaver

    Let’s not forget about William Still who worked with Harriet Tubman on the Underground Railroad. He kept records of each escaping slave, which if found would have meant his life and the lives of those who had escaped. His brave journaling allowed the reunion of many displaced families.

    His brother, without knowing, came to him to find any remaining family members not knowing that William was in fact his brother.

    I am not trying to downplay the amazing work of Harriet Tubman, I just think these stories should be told together.

Leave a Comment