When Truman told Stalin about the Manhattan project in July of 1945, Stalin displayed little reaction, since Stalin had known about the project for almost 4 years before Truman, and he arguably knew more about it than Truman himself did.

POTSDAM AND THE FINAL DECISION TO USE THE BOMB

After President Harry S. Truman received word of the success of the Trinity test, his need for the help of the Soviet Union in the war against Japan was greatly diminished. The Soviet leader, Joseph Stalin, had promised to join the war against Japan by August 15th. Truman and his advisors now were not sure they wanted this help. If use of the atomic bomb made victory possible without an invasion, then accepting Soviet help would only invite them into the discussions regarding the postwar fate of Japan. During the second week of Allied deliberations at Potsdam, on the evening of July 24, 1945, Truman approached Stalin without an interpreter and, as casually as he could, told him that the United States had a “new weapon of unusual destructive… Continue Reading (7 minute read)

13 thoughts on “When Truman told Stalin about the Manhattan project in July of 1945, Stalin displayed little reaction, since Stalin had known about the project for almost 4 years before Truman, and he arguably knew more about it than Truman himself did.”

  1. Gemmabeta

    Truman’s job during WWII was to investigate waste, profiteering, and corruption regarding the war effort.

    Hiding the 2 billion dollars of black money funneled into the Manhattan Project probably took some skill.

    It wasn’t for lack of trying, The Truman Committee ran the largest whistleblowing program in American history, and was responsible for saving the government $20 billion over the course of the war, worth about $300 billion today.

    All on a budget of $100k a year too.

  2. ilikeunity

    We used to joke in the Navy that don’t worry if you lose your top secret documents, because we can always request a backup copy from the Soviets.

  3. zuzg

    I had a brain fart for a second and wondered what the Truman show and Stalin had to do with each other.

  4. Stereomceez2212

    He didn’t tell Stalin much about it, except we had a weapon that possessed “enormous power that could level cities”.

    FYI Stalin already knew about the project due his spy network (which included Klaus Fuchs, a Manhattan Project physicist).

  5. tpaxatb1

    Truman probably barely knew about it because he had lliterally inherited the Presidency 3 months before the Trinity test and he was kept completely in the dark (Roosevelt barely talked to him about anything)

  6. existentialism91342

    In Soviet Russia, American secrets know you.

  7. deglazethefond

    Partially why the us was so heavy handed with the atomic bomb at the time.

  8. ahbi_santini2

    Irony is that when McCarthy was waiving his blank paper and ranting about the government being filled with Communist spies, he was correct.

    Had no proof, and an asshole, but completely correct.

  9. inexcess

    And yet had nothing to show for it. He was probably butthurt.

  10. atlas_eater

    That was interesting, I never knew that the Japanese used Kamikaze submarines.

    The United States continued to suffer casualties in late July and early August 1945, especially from Japanese submarines and suicidal “kamikaze” attacks using aircraft and midget submarines. (One example of this is the loss of the Indianapolis, which was sunk by a Japanese submarine on July 29,

  11. Naneger

    I just read about this in the book entitled Agent Sonya. The Russia spies that gave the nuclear info to Stalin truly believed they were making the world safer by balancing out the information. They did not think it was right for the US and GB to have the nuclear power exclusively. Interesting book.

  12. starkistuna

    Wouldnt it had been funny if Stalin said yes we have same research people working on it, we will test ours 4 years later , do you want to make a bet?

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