Home » Law & Government » Public Safety » Crime & Justice » The famous mobster Al Capone sponsored a soup kitchen during the great depression. On average, his charity would feed about 2,200 Chicagoans 3 meals per day. No second helpings were denied. No questions were asked, and no one was asked to prove their need.

The famous mobster Al Capone sponsored a soup kitchen during the great depression. On average, his charity would feed about 2,200 Chicagoans 3 meals per day. No second helpings were denied. No questions were asked, and no one was asked to prove their need.

Mobster Al Capone Ran a Soup Kitchen During the Great Depression

Chicago shivered through a particularly bleak November in 1930. As the U.S. economy plummeted into the Great Depression, thousands of the Windy City’s jobless huddled three times a day in a long line snaking away from a newly opened soup kitchen. With cold hands stuffed into overcoat pockets as empty as their stomachs, the needy shuffled toward the big banner that declared “Free Soup Coffee & Doughnuts for the Unemployed.”

The kind-hearted philanthropist who had come to their aid was none other than “Public Enemy Number One,” Al Capone.

Capone certainly made for an unlikely humanitarian. Chicago’s most notorious gangster had built his multi-million-dollar bootlegging, prostitution and gambling operation upon a foundation of extortio… Continue Reading (4 minute read)

Leave a Comment