Search Results for: montana

There is a Montana Law that if a student rides a horse to school, the principal has to feed, water, and tend the horse. Six seniors who were aware of this law rode their horses on the last day of school. Their principal did his duty and took care of their horses.

Thanks to an Old Montana Law for an Amazing Senior Prank You may have heard of some old laws in Montana, that are still “on the books.” Silly laws like, “You can’t eat ice cream on a Sunday,” or “Single women are not allowed to fish alone.” But, thanks to an old Montana law, some …

There is a Montana Law that if a student rides a horse to school, the principal has to feed, water, and tend the horse. Six seniors who were aware of this law rode their horses on the last day of school. Their principal did his duty and took care of their horses. Read More »

A teenaged Evel Kinevel, while working at a copper mine, popped a wheelie with a piece of heavy machinery. He hit a power line, causing the city of Butte, Montana to lose power for several hours.

Evel Knievel Robert Craig Knievel (/kˈniːvəl/; October 17, 1938 – November 30, 2007), professionally known as Evel Knievel, was an American stunt performer and entertainer. Over the course of his career, he attempted more than 75 ramp-to-ramp motorcycle jumps. Knievel was inducted into the Motorcycle Hall of Fame in 1999. He died of pulmonary disease …

A teenaged Evel Kinevel, while working at a copper mine, popped a wheelie with a piece of heavy machinery. He hit a power line, causing the city of Butte, Montana to lose power for several hours. Read More »

In 1970, a fighter pilot was forced to eject during a training mission. His plane, however, righted itself and continued flying for miles, finally touching down gently in a farmer’s field. It earned the nickname “The Cornfield Bomber.”

Cornfield Bomber The “Cornfield Bomber” was the nickname given to a Convair F-106 Delta Dart, operated by the 71st Fighter-Interceptor Squadron of the United States Air Force. In 1970, during a training exercise, it made an unpiloted landing in a farmer’s field in Montana, suffering only minor damage, after the pilot had ejected from the …

In 1970, a fighter pilot was forced to eject during a training mission. His plane, however, righted itself and continued flying for miles, finally touching down gently in a farmer’s field. It earned the nickname “The Cornfield Bomber.” Read More »

Native Americans created a universal sign language that allowed 2/3 of all Indigenous tribes to communicate across most of North America, hundreds of years before Europeans invented a sign language of their own.

Plains Indian Sign Language Linguists work hard to try to save many languages from extinction, and one that has come close to that point is Plains Indian Sign Language or PISL. This was once one of the most widespread languages in the Americas, and its history predates most European variations of sign language. Today, less …

Native Americans created a universal sign language that allowed 2/3 of all Indigenous tribes to communicate across most of North America, hundreds of years before Europeans invented a sign language of their own. Read More »

Here’s a fact about Civilian Public Service (CPS), a US government program that provided conscientious objectors with an alternative to military service during World War II. CPS draftees fought forest fires, helped reform an abusive mental health system, and even acted as test subjects in medical experiments.

Civilian Public Service firefighting crew at Snowline Camp near Camino, California, 1945. The Civilian Public Service (CPS) was a program of the United States government that provided conscientious objectors with an alternative to military service during World War II. From 1941 to 1947, nearly 12,000 draftees, willing to serve their country in some capacity but …

Here’s a fact about Civilian Public Service (CPS), a US government program that provided conscientious objectors with an alternative to military service during World War II. CPS draftees fought forest fires, helped reform an abusive mental health system, and even acted as test subjects in medical experiments. Read More »

Atlanta artist TI has saved at least two people from suicide attempts. One of them was the lead singer of Creed, Scott Stapp. The other was a 24-year-old Atlanta resident who was going to jump from a 22-story building. After hearing about the situation, TI drove to the scene to help.

In 2001, Harris formed the Southern hip hop group P$C, alongside his longtime friends and fellow Atlanta-based rappers Big Kuntry King, Mac Boney, and C-Rod. Upon being released from Arista, Harris signed to Atlantic and subsequently became the co-chief executive officer (CEO) of his own label imprint, Grand Hustle Records, which he launched in 2003.[2][3] …

Atlanta artist TI has saved at least two people from suicide attempts. One of them was the lead singer of Creed, Scott Stapp. The other was a 24-year-old Atlanta resident who was going to jump from a 22-story building. After hearing about the situation, TI drove to the scene to help. Read More »