Mr T., born Lawrence Tureaud, took on his moniker after hearing all his family members called “boy” by strangers. He decided the only way for a black man to earn a title of respect was to make that title part of his name, so Mr. would be the first thing out of everyone’s mouth.

Happy Birthday: Mr. T

Happy Birthday actor Mr. T

Born: Lawrence Tureaud

May 21, 1952 in Chicago, Illinois, USA

Quotes:

[Playboy magazine – September 1983] I am the best bodyguard, because I’ll take a bullet, I’ll take a stab wound, I’ll take a hit upside the head; I’m like a Kamikaze pilot; The President got shot because his men relaxed.

I believe in the Golden Rule – The Man with the Gold… Rules.

I pity the fool… [his trademark quote]

When I was growing up, my family was so poor we couldn’t afford to pay attention.

As a kid, I got three meals a day. Oatmeal, miss-a-meal and no meal.

I think about my father being called ‘boy’, my uncle being called ‘boy’, my brother, coming back from Vietnam and being called ‘boy’. So I questi… Continue Reading (2 minute read)

8 thoughts on “Mr T., born Lawrence Tureaud, took on his moniker after hearing all his family members called “boy” by strangers. He decided the only way for a black man to earn a title of respect was to make that title part of his name, so Mr. would be the first thing out of everyone’s mouth.”

  1. DeepScrub999

    He’s also a lvl 60 night elf mohawk.

  2. Plegu

    Didn’t he also start wearing the jewelry while working as an ~~doorman~~ bouncer at a nightclub? IIRC he collected all the things people left there or gave him and wore them first as a joke.

  3. borisvonboris

    I wonder what Mr T is up to these days. Seems like he’s off the radar.

  4. Idpolisdumb

    I wonder if he got tired of being called Mister Mister T

  5. spectre73

    “First name MISTER! Middle name PERIOD! Last name T!”

  6. supercyberlurker

    Ironic that Mr. T projected this sort of tough-guy streetwise pseudocriminal aura (I mean, The A-Team… you know..), wore tons of gold chains.. yet turned out to be a pretty respectable guy and a good role model. Then there’s Bill Cosby who at first -seemed- pretty respectable and a good role model.. but then…

  7. RUA_bug_Bill_Murray

    Currently reading [*Caste* by Isabel Wilkerson](https://www.amazon.com/Caste-Origins-Discontents-Isabel-Wilkerson/dp/0593230256), in Chapter 5 she tells the story of a woman named Miss Hale.

    So you have Harold Hale, who grew up in the Jim Crow south, where black people were never called “Mr.”, “Miss” or “Mrs.”, was sick of it so he gave his daughter the first name of Miss. Then you have this story, straight from the book:

    >The local high schools began permitting the two castes to go to school together in the early 1970s, before the family had arrived. When she was in tenth grade, she and her friends attracted unexpected attention for the walkie-talkies they used during their breaks between classes. This was before cellphones, and it allowed her to keep in touch with her friends, who’d gather at her locker at break time. The principal called her into his office one day, suspicious of the activity and wanting to know why these people were gathered around her locker. She showed him the device.

    >He asked her name.

    >“Miss Hale,” she said.

    >“What’s your first name?”

    >“It’s Miss.”

    >“I said, what is your first name?”

    >“My name is Miss.”

    >“I don’t have time for this foolishness. What’s your real name?”

    >She repeated the name her father had given her. The principal was agitated now, and told an assistant to get her records. The records confirmed her name.

    >“Hale. Hale,” he repeated to himself, trying to figure out the origins of this breach in protocol. In small southern towns, the white people knew or expected to know all the black people, the majority of whom would be dependent on the dominant caste for their income or survival one way or the other. He was trying to figure out what black family had had the nerve to name their daughter Miss, knowing the fix it would put the white people in.

    >“Hale. I don’t know any Hales,” he finally said. “You’re not from around here. Where is your father from?”

    >“He’s from Alabama.”

    >“Who does he work for?”

    >She told him the name of the company, which was based outside of Texas. She told him it was a Fortune 500 company. Her parents had taught her to say this in hopes of giving her some extra protection.

    >“I knew you weren’t from around here,” he said. “Know how I know?”

    >She shook her head, waiting to be excused.

    >“You looked me in the eye when I was talking,” he said of this breach in caste. “Colored folks from around here know better than to do that.”

    >She was finally excused, and when she got home that day, she told her father what happened. He had waited twenty years for this moment.

    >“What did he say? And then what did you say? And what did he say after that?”

    >He could barely contain himself. The plan was working.

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