English cricket great Denis Compton was renowned for his absent-mindedness. He once arrived at a match without his kitbag, so he used an antique bat from the stadium’s museum; and during a major celebration in honour of his 70th birthday, his mother rang, telling him that he was only 69

Denis Compton

Compton’s absent-mindedness was legendary. Colin Cowdrey writes that Compton turned up for the Old Trafford Test of 1955 against South Africa without his kitbag. Undaunted, he sauntered into the museum and, borrowing an antique bat off the display, went on to score 158 and 71. Nevertheless, England lost by three wickets. This absent-mindedness was particularly obvious in his tendency to run out his partners at the crease: Trevor Bailey declared that ‘a call for a run from Compton should be treated as no more than a basis for negotiation.’ In typical form, at his brother Leslie’s benefit match in 1955, he managed to run him out before he had faced a single ball.

Peter Parfitt, the Middlesex and England batsman, was a speaker at a ma… Continue Reading (4 minute read)

12 thoughts on “English cricket great Denis Compton was renowned for his absent-mindedness. He once arrived at a match without his kitbag, so he used an antique bat from the stadium’s museum; and during a major celebration in honour of his 70th birthday, his mother rang, telling him that he was only 69”

  1. malalatargaryen

    >Compton’s absent-mindedness was legendary. Colin Cowdrey writes that Compton turned up for the Old Trafford Test of 1955 against South Africa without his kitbag. Undaunted, he sauntered into the museum and, borrowing an antique bat off the display, went on to score 158 and 71 *(making him the match’s top scorer for either team)*. Nevertheless, England lost by three wickets. This absent-mindedness was particularly obvious in his tendency to run out his partners at the crease: Trevor Bailey declared that ‘a call for a run from Compton should be treated as no more than a basis for negotiation.’ In typical form, at his brother Leslie’s benefit match in 1955, he managed to run him out before he had faced a single ball.

    >Peter Parfitt, the Middlesex and England batsman, was a speaker at a major celebration in London for Compton’s 70th birthday. He claims that the chief guest was called to the telephone by a lady who had heard about the dinner: eventually, he agreed to take the call. “Denis,” she said, “it’s me, your mother. You’re not 70, you’re only 69.”

    He was also a successful football player, winning both the league and the FA Cup with Arsenal.

  2. Prankmore

    As someone with ADHD this all sounds pretty normal. Well except being any good at cricket.

  3. AllISaidWasJehovah

    It’s important to bear in mind that antiques weren’t anywhere near as old in those days as they are now.

  4. tompink57

    Reminds me of Rube Waddell, old timey baseball player. Opposing fans would literally hold up puppies or shiny things midgame to distract him.

  5. fhost344

    These are by far the most outrageous and interesting things that have ever happened in the world of cricket.

  6. Talonqr

    “Bruh your up”

    “Hmmm, oh, what?”

    “Its your bat”

    “My what now?”

    “We’re playing cricket, your a cricket player”

    “Shit, ohhhhh yea I remember now!”

  7. satorsquarepants

    Petition to add this man to the canon of patron saints of ADHD, along with Theodore Roosevelt, Azumaki Naruto, Thomas Sawyer, Calvin, Leonardo Davinki, and Bartholomew Simpson.

  8. c74isk

    ok then, there’s hope for me still

  9. TheRedmanCometh

    Ngl I thought I turned 30 last year for 2 months…I turned 29…I’m 30 this February not last

  10. Hex_Drinker

    But his Mom was alive and still sharp enough to remind her son he was 69… His absent minded trait was definitely a dad gene.

  11. Chicken_McFlurry

    This reads like an episode from “The Dollop”.

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