In 2018, A hacker broke into people’s routers (100,000 of them) and patched their vulnerabilities up so that they couldn’t be abused by other hackers.

A mysterious grey-hat is patching people’s outdated MikroTik routers

A Russian-speaking grey-hat hacker is breaking into people’s MikroTik routers and patching devices so they can’t be abused by cryptojackers, botnet herders, or other cyber-criminals, ZDNet has learned.

The hacker, who goes by the name of Alexey and says he works as a server administrator, claims to have disinfected over 100,000 MikroTik routers already.

Alexey has not been trying to hide his actions and has boasted about his hobby on a Russian blogging platform. He says he accesses routers and makes changes to their settings to prevent further abuse.

“I added firewall rules that blocked access to the router from outside the local network,” Alexey said. “In the comments, I wrote information about the vulnerability and left the ad… Continue Reading (4 minute read)

15 thoughts on “In 2018, A hacker broke into people’s routers (100,000 of them) and patched their vulnerabilities up so that they couldn’t be abused by other hackers.”

  1. primaski

    I was shocked to find out that only 50 of the 100,000 people whose computers he saved reached out to the address he provided, but was even more shocked that MOST of them were outraged. How ungrateful can these people be, honestly

  2. Letterchrome

    You are a bad guy but this doesn’t mean you are a bad guy!

  3. icebattler

    Truly a modern day vigilante

  4. CardinalCanuck

    Who is this hackerman? Some say he is a person named 4chan, others say nah man he some other hackerman. Hackerman? Hackerman! Does everything à hacker can!

  5. Rowmyownboat

    As John Lewis would say, Good Trouble.

  6. Bumbleclat

    I always wondered if that ever happened

  7. halalanalrape

    And here I am updating my neighbors router while stealing their internet. Everything was cool until one day i printed on their printer

  8. Clementng1995

    The Anti-hacker hacker…nice one

  9. Nythoren

    Back in the early “@Home” days, the Cox@Home cable modems were basically just nodes in a giant open network. If someone hadn’t locked down their computer, it would typically be set to “share with network”, so you could access it like any other computer on your network. A friend of mine made a hobby out of checking the Cox@Home network for open computers, networking in to them and, if they had a printer, printing out the “how to secure your computer” instructions. I like to think that he anonymously helped a lot of people in those early days of cable modem networks.

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