Meet the symbiotic relationship of wolves and ravens. Ravens will lead wolves to prey so that they can take a portion of the leftovers, play games of tail chasing with each other, and develop individual friendships.

Wolves and Ravens – Nature’s Odd Couple

The wolf’s effective hunt of large prey and striking, soulful appearance have attracted both haters and lovers of this wild predator.

Wolves were so despised that the U.S. government established a bounty program that helped to eliminate all but a few hundred wolves in the United States by the 1930s. But thanks to the Endangered Species Act, the wolves are successfully being reintroduced to their place in nature, and it is the raven who loves its new ecosystem partner.

Nature’s Odd Couple

Much like their human counterparts, ravens and wolves have formed a mutually beneficial relationship in which they seem to both respect and engage each other in playful activities.

Although many animals benefit from a wolf pack’s kill of an … Continue Reading (3 minute read)

6 thoughts on “Meet the symbiotic relationship of wolves and ravens. Ravens will lead wolves to prey so that they can take a portion of the leftovers, play games of tail chasing with each other, and develop individual friendships.”

  1. R4DAG4ST

    This explains a lot! We do a lot of outdooring with our dogs and it’s very common to have ravens “play” with our dogs, even so much as one time when we were overlanding we had a raven follow the trucks for the better part of two days, interacting with the dogs at every stop.

    Who knew?

  2. cslogin

    New insight into *Game of Thrones*.

  3. peacehippo84

    I can absolutely confirm this weird connection between Ravens and Canine fam.

    I used to work pretty far up north in Canada drilling and blasting in an open pit quarry. There was a “quarry” dog, snagle toothed, no owner, god knows how old. There was also a pit Raven. In the bottom of the pit at lunch they would both get fed scraps.

    It seemed the pit dog did not like to eat cheetos for whatever reason but didnt want to give them up right away to the raven. The dog would approach the chetto at about 5 feet, the raven would do the same on the other side. The dog would move one foot forward, the raven one foot back. Dog would back up one foot, the raven moved forward 1 foot.

    It was like a dance, the dog clearly did not want to harm the Raven, just enjoyed the company.

  4. alternativesonder

    As a guess, I bet the wolves would rip up any carcass making it easier for the ravens to eat.

  5. Tipper92

    More sources and info:

    [https://www.yellowstone.org/naturalist-notes-wolves-and-ravens/#:\~:text=Ravens%20and%20wolves%20have%20a,serve%20as%20potential%20food%20providers.&text=As%20many%20as%20135%20ravens%20have%20been%20seen%20on%20one%20carcass](https://www.yellowstone.org/naturalist-notes-wolves-and-ravens/#:~:text=Ravens%20and%20wolves%20have%20a,serve%20as%20potential%20food%20providers.&text=As%20many%20as%20135%20ravens%20have%20been%20seen%20on%20one%20carcass)!

    [http://canislupus101.blogspot.com/p/wolves-ravens.html#:\~:text=The%20raven%2Dwolf%20association%20may,as%20extra%20eyes%20and%20ears.%22](http://canislupus101.blogspot.com/p/wolves-ravens.html#:~:text=The%20raven%2Dwolf%20association%20may,as%20extra%20eyes%20and%20ears.%22)

    [http://adirondackwildlife.org/WolvesRavens.html](http://adirondackwildlife.org/WolvesRavens.html)

  6. DistinctStyle

    Same thing with Bats and pigs. Bats will lead pigs to their dung heaps where truffles grow, the pigs forage, thereby cleaning the cave and allowing the colony to grow.

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