The famous Japanese painting of a giant wave is actually from a series of 36 paintings of Mt. Fuji from different views

Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji

For other uses, see Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji (disambiguation).

The Great Wave off Kanagawa, the best known print in the series.

(Reprint by Adachi from the Shōwa period (1926–1989)

Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji (Japanese: 富嶽三十六景, Hepburn: Fugaku Sanjūrokkei) is a series of landscape prints by the Japanese ukiyo-e artist Hokusai (1760–1849). The series depicts Mount Fuji from different locations and in various seasons and weather conditions. The immediate success of the publication led to another ten prints being added to the series.

The series was produced from c. 1830 to 1832, when Hokusai was in his seventies and at the height of his career, and published by Nishimura Yohachi. Among the prints are three of Hokusai’s… Continue Reading (5 minute read)

9 thoughts on “The famous Japanese painting of a giant wave is actually from a series of 36 paintings of Mt. Fuji from different views”

  1. _Mechaloth_

    Worked with the prints from this series during my days at a museum, as well as a lot of other artists’ prints. The blue is as vivid on the prints themselves as in the pictures (no touch-ups) because it is a synthetic color (Hiroshige blue or Berlin blue ベルリンブルー in Japan, Prussian blue elsewhere) versus the mineral pigments which were used earlier.

  2. BurpingBlastoise

    Katsushika Hokusai is a genius, and also a big eccentric.

    Guy literally invented tentacle porn through one of his works.

  3. mercuryfast

    Wow, he lived to be 88 back in the 1700s/1800s. How often do you hear this: “Hokusai was in his seventies and at the height of his career.”

  4. mikeeteevee

    Wait til you find out about the Dream of the Fisherman’s Wife.

  5. inspired_butterfly17

    Another fun fact: it’s not actually a painting, per se.

    In Japanese culture it’s called “ukiyo-e”.

    It’s done with carving out the main subject in wood, using water colors, and a lot of repetition. It’s actually quite interesting and beautiful to watch. 🙂

    (An example of what I mean: https://youtu.be/t8uF3PZ3KGQ)

  6. Koneko_Chibi

    and then theres 10 additional more !

  7. Ubelsteiner

    I love Hokusai’s work, but I really love Koitsu’s works with Fuji in the backgroud, his landscapes are amazing, particularly the lighting.

  8. howlandwolfe

    I saw a set of the printing woodblocks at the MFA Boston six years ago.

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