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Visual Art & Design

How Did Building Churches with Egg Whites Influence Filipino Desserts?

The Spaniards colonized the Philippines for over three centuries. When settlements were made, stone buildings were erected. Aside from the evident influence in architectural design, what construction technology was applied? The massive church buildings made during the Spanish Colonial Period used egg whites to reinforce the strength of the building. Recipes for Filipino desserts use …

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How Long Did It Take to Make One Block in the Pyramid of Giza?

The Pyramids at Giza are some of the world’s most breathtaking wonders. Theories about the building of the pyramids have long surrounded this wonder. The answer remains unanswered even by scientists.  Modern archaeological experts find that the Great Pyramid’s construction needed 3,000 men to produce 250 blocks per day for its structure. Much time and …

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Why Do South Florida Building Codes Require Doors to Swing Outward?

After  what  Hurricane Andrew brought about in South Florida, engineers devised  better ways to avoid property destruction. Who would have known that simply switching the orientation of how your doors open can help protect your property in a hurricane event? In South Florida, building standards require entry doors to swing out because they offer greater …

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Leonardo da Vinci received complaints about his procrastinating from one of the priors while painting The Last Supper. He solved the argument by threatening to use that particular prior as the model for Judas in the fresco. The complaints stopped shortly after he made this remark.

28 Interesting Facts About The Last Supper Painting It’s without a doubt one of the most recognized paintings of all time, created by the ultimate polymath in history. In this post, You’ll discover the ultimate list of facts about the Last Supper Painting. 1. The Last Supper has an illustrious painter The Last Supper was …

Leonardo da Vinci received complaints about his procrastinating from one of the priors while painting The Last Supper. He solved the argument by threatening to use that particular prior as the model for Judas in the fresco. The complaints stopped shortly after he made this remark. Read More »

‘Saturn devouring his son’ and the 13 other Black Paintings were never meant for public display. In 1819 Francisco Goya went into near isolation and painted the works directly onto the walls of his house. The haunting pictures reflect Goya’s internal demons and civil strife occurring in Spain

“Saturn Devouring His Son” by Francisco Goya “Saturn Devouring His Son” by Francisco Goya depicts the Greek myth of the Titan, who fears that he would be overthrown by one of his children, so he ate each one of his children upon their birth. The work is one of the 14 Black Paintings that Goya …

‘Saturn devouring his son’ and the 13 other Black Paintings were never meant for public display. In 1819 Francisco Goya went into near isolation and painted the works directly onto the walls of his house. The haunting pictures reflect Goya’s internal demons and civil strife occurring in Spain Read More »

The famous Japanese painting of a giant wave is actually from a series of 36 paintings of Mt. Fuji from different views

Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji For other uses, see Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji (disambiguation). The Great Wave off Kanagawa, the best known print in the series. (Reprint by Adachi from the Shōwa period (1926–1989) Thirty-six Views of Mount Fuji (Japanese: 富嶽三十六景, Hepburn: Fugaku Sanjūrokkei) is a series of landscape prints by the Japanese ukiyo-e …

The famous Japanese painting of a giant wave is actually from a series of 36 paintings of Mt. Fuji from different views Read More »

Graffiti artist Banksy sought to trademark his image of a protester throwing flowers. The trademark office denied it on the grounds of him having no interest in selling his work. In the ruling they used a quote from one of Banksy’s books: “copyright is for losers”

Banksy loses battle with greetings card firm over ‘flower bomber’ trademark image copyrightGetty Images Banksy has lost a battle with a greetings card firm over the trademark of one of his most famous works. North Yorkshire-based Full Colour Black challenged the artist’s right to trademark his image of a protester throwing a bunch of flowers. …

Graffiti artist Banksy sought to trademark his image of a protester throwing flowers. The trademark office denied it on the grounds of him having no interest in selling his work. In the ruling they used a quote from one of Banksy’s books: “copyright is for losers” Read More »

The entrance of the Lascaux cave in southwestern France, famous for its Paleolithic cave paintings, was discovered in 1940 by 18-year-old Marcel Ravidat and his dog, Robot. Robot fell into a hole, and Ravidat explored it with his friends, finding walls covered with depictions of animals.

Lascaux For Lascaux in the Corrèze department, see Lascaux, Corrèze. Lascaux (French: Grotte de Lascaux, “Lascaux Cave”; English: /læsˈkoʊ/, French: [lasko]) is a complex of caves near the village of Montignac, in the department of Dordogne in southwestern France. Over 600 parietal wall paintings cover the interior walls and ceilings of the cave. The paintings …

The entrance of the Lascaux cave in southwestern France, famous for its Paleolithic cave paintings, was discovered in 1940 by 18-year-old Marcel Ravidat and his dog, Robot. Robot fell into a hole, and Ravidat explored it with his friends, finding walls covered with depictions of animals. Read More »

Michelangelo hid under the Medici Chapel in Florence for 3 months during a period of political turmoil, occupying his time by sketching on the walls with charcoal. His whereabouts were a secret for almost 500 years until the museum director stumbled upon the drawings in 1976.

Michelangelo’s Hidden Drawings In 1530, to escape the wrath of the Pope, Michelangelo holed up in a tiny secret room under the Medici Chapel of the Basilica di San Lorenzo. The artist had been working on the lavish tomb when all hell broke loose in Florence, and he was forced into hiding. With nothing but …

Michelangelo hid under the Medici Chapel in Florence for 3 months during a period of political turmoil, occupying his time by sketching on the walls with charcoal. His whereabouts were a secret for almost 500 years until the museum director stumbled upon the drawings in 1976. Read More »