Hindu holy books ‘Vedas’ refer to a “third sex,” roughly defined as people for whom sex is not procreative, either through impotence or a lack of desire for the opposite sex. Members of the third sex are sometimes sometimes recognized for having divine powers or insights.

Stances of Faiths on LGBTQ Issues: Hinduism

In Hindu belief, deities can take many forms, but all combine in the universal spirit of Brahman. Unlike Judaism, Christianity and Islam, which focus on the actions of a single lifetime, Hindu belief centers on a continuous process of birth and rebirth that ultimately releases the true self from the limitations of body and the ego – a freeing of the spirit called moksha. That process includes a release from sensual experiences, including sexuality. Hindu sacred texts, however, do not distinguish between heterosexual and homosexual acts. While Hindu sacred texts do not specifically use those terms (heterosexual and homosexual), they do distinguish between procreative sexual acts (within marriage) and non-procreative sexual acts such as oral,… Continue Reading (3 minute read)

7 thoughts on “Hindu holy books ‘Vedas’ refer to a “third sex,” roughly defined as people for whom sex is not procreative, either through impotence or a lack of desire for the opposite sex. Members of the third sex are sometimes sometimes recognized for having divine powers or insights.”

  1. stonksman8332

    So basically not being horny makes you a god

  2. Miscterious

    Whats interesting about the evolution of religions is that there’s survivor bias laden within the texts.

    If the “third sex” were ostracized, then the religious text would likely have not mentioned anything, or specifically condemned the existence of something non-male/female.

    The “divine powers or insights” is protective. “Don’t kill or expunge this group of people, because they still have a benefit for society.”

  3. ninja_of_hoodies

    Since I had a vasectomy, sex is no longer procreative for me. Am I a god now?

  4. bottleboy8

    Samoans also have a third gender (Fa’afafine).

    “Faʻafafine are people who identify themselves as having a third-gender or non-binary role in Samoa, American Samoa and the Samoan diaspora. A recognized gender identity/gender role in traditional Samoan society, and an integral part of Samoan culture, faʻafafine are assigned male at birth, and explicitly embody both masculine and feminine gender traits in a way unique to Polynesia. Their behaviour typically ranges from extravagantly feminine to conventionally masculine.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fa%27afafine

  5. p4rc0pr3s1s

    I instantly thought of Costanza and the Portuguese waitress.

  6. thenameofapet

    So basically asexual?

  7. FFkonked

    If only I could harness the power of post nut… I’d be a god

Leave a Comment