Author and radio host Amy Krouse Rosenthal publicly announced that she had ovarian cancer by writing a modern love essay for the NY Times that was a dating profile for her soon to be widower husband. She died 10 days after publication.

Amy Krouse Rosenthal

Amy Krouse Rosenthal (April 29, 1965 – March 13, 2017) was an American author of both adult and children’s books, a short film maker, and radio show host. She is best known for her memoir Encyclopedia of an Ordinary Life, her children’s picture books, and the film project The Beckoning of Lovely. She was a prolific writer, publishing more than 30 children’s books between 2005 and her death in 2017. She is the only author to have three children’s books make the Best Children’s Books for Family Literacy list in the same year. She was a contributor to Chicago’s NPR affiliate WBEZ, and to the TED conference.

Books

Amy Krouse Rosenthal wrote for both adults and children. Rosenthal had several books on the New York Times bestseller list: … Continue Reading (7 minute read)

13 thoughts on “Author and radio host Amy Krouse Rosenthal publicly announced that she had ovarian cancer by writing a modern love essay for the NY Times that was a dating profile for her soon to be widower husband. She died 10 days after publication.”

  1. ReasonablyConfused

    That is hauntingly sad, and deeply beautiful.

  2. Splunge-

    Damn. Made me cry when I read it when it came out. Made me cry again just now.

  3. shlomo127

    She wrote the children’s book series Uni the Unicorn, which my daughter loves. I googled her a few weeks ago to find out when the next book is coming out and found the above piece as well as some of the follow up stuff her husband has written about finding new love. Was not expecting to cry at work….

  4. MyUncannyValley

    I remember when this was published. I was frozen silent, in awe of her. There’s also a recorded audio version that’s just as beautiful.

  5. Sparta2019

    Lost my wife to ovarian cancer.

    Was rough reading about this, but a beautiful sentiment.

  6. ActiveFrontEnd

    Wife and I already have already set up our plan if one of us dies. Essentially the older we get the window for respectable mourning becomes smaller. Once I reach my 80s I can bang some hussy in the old folks’ home the next week. The next day if it is the dementia ward.

  7. vargr1

    My wife passed away in October of 2010 of ovarian cancer. We had been together for 20 years.

    It took me a while, and some therapy, and the care of many friends, to come to.the conclusion that she would want me to keep living and keep loving.

    I married the second great love of my life in October of last year. It took me ten years to find someone as awesome.

    I think my wife would like her.

  8. EmmalouEsq

    It’s so scary that life can change so dramatically and so suddenly. These two seemed to have a wonderful life together with a beautiful love story.

  9. captainperoxide

    This story was published in the Modern Love NYT column, which was later adapted into a wonderful book and Amazon Prime series. I’d highly recommend both.

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