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Reproductive Health

Who Developed the First Pregnancy Test?

Have you ever wondered how early civilizations determined their pregnancy status without using a modern-day pregnancy kit? According to an ancient Egyptian manuscript translated by experts at the University of Copenhagen reveals an outdated method of determining the sex of a baby and a woman’s pregnancy through the sprouting of grains.  Egyptian papyrus manuscripts dated …

Who Developed the First Pregnancy Test? Read More »

“morning wood” is medically important to penile health, and that not having it over extend periods of time is a possible sign of a health issue.

Everything You Need To Know About Morning Wood We include products we think are useful for our readers. If you buy through links on this page, we may earn a small commission. Here’s our process. What does this mean? Morning wood, or as it’s formally known, nocturnal penile tumescence (NPT), is a common occurrence for …

“morning wood” is medically important to penile health, and that not having it over extend periods of time is a possible sign of a health issue. Read More »

The oldest method for pregnancy detection dated back 3500 years ago. Woman peed on barley and wheat seeds. If the seeds grew, she was pregnant. If the barley seed grew first it was a boy, otherwise a girl. If nothing grew she wasn’t pregnant. The method turns out it’s accurate 70% of the time!

Egyptian Papyrus Reveals This Old Wives’ Tale Is Very Old Indeed Throughout history, cultures around the world have come up with lots of folk prognostications for predicting the sex assigned at birth. If the mother craves sweets, it’s a girl; if she eats a lot of garlic, it’s also a girl. Have a healthy glow? …

The oldest method for pregnancy detection dated back 3500 years ago. Woman peed on barley and wheat seeds. If the seeds grew, she was pregnant. If the barley seed grew first it was a boy, otherwise a girl. If nothing grew she wasn’t pregnant. The method turns out it’s accurate 70% of the time! Read More »

It was widely assumed that infants felt no pain and they routinely underwent major surgeries without anesthesia up until infant pain was formally recognized in 1987.

Discovering Pain in Newborn Infants Randomised Trial of Fentanyl Anesthesia in Preterm Babies Undergoing Surgery: Effects on the Stress Response. By Anand KJ, Sippell WG, and Aynsley-Green A. Lancet 1987; 1:243–8. Reprinted with permission. In a randomised controlled trial, preterm babies undergoing ligation of a patent ductus arteriosus were given nitrous oxide and d-tubocurarine, with …

It was widely assumed that infants felt no pain and they routinely underwent major surgeries without anesthesia up until infant pain was formally recognized in 1987. Read More »

Meet Continuum, a magazine devoted to proving HIV/AIDS is hoax. It ceased publishing after all of its core members died of HIV complications.

Continuum (magazine) Continuum was a magazine published by an activist group of the same name who denied the existence of HIV/AIDS. Favoring pseudoscientific content, the magazine addressed issues related to HIV/AIDS, AIDS denialism, alternative medicine, and themes of interest to the LGBT community. It ran from December 1992 until February 2001 and ceased publication because …

Meet Continuum, a magazine devoted to proving HIV/AIDS is hoax. It ceased publishing after all of its core members died of HIV complications. Read More »

In 1985, Wong-Staal became the first person to clone HIV and to generate a genetic mapping of the virus which would be used for the research and design of treatments for AIDS.

Flossie Wong-Staal KEYWORDS: Yee Ching Wong, Flossie Wong-Staal, AIDS, HIV SHE THOUGHT IT Flossie Wong-Staal is a Chinese-American scientist who holds a bachelor’s degree in Bacteriology (1968) and a PhD in Molecular Biology (1972) both from the University of California in Los Angeles. Her professional career in a laboratory started in the early 1970s when …

In 1985, Wong-Staal became the first person to clone HIV and to generate a genetic mapping of the virus which would be used for the research and design of treatments for AIDS. Read More »

The rise in non-traditional sexual relations that marked the “swinging ’60s” actually began during the ’50s. Recent analysis indicates that widespread use of penicillin, leading to a 75% decline in syphilis deaths during the 1950s, launched the modern sexual era, and not the birth control pill

9 Surprising Facts About the Scientific Study of Sex The scientific study of sex is much more exciting than an awkward sex ed class. While writing my book Sex Weird-o-Pedia, these were some of the most interesting facts about science and sex that I came across. 1. Some sex researchers didn’t want their findings to …

The rise in non-traditional sexual relations that marked the “swinging ’60s” actually began during the ’50s. Recent analysis indicates that widespread use of penicillin, leading to a 75% decline in syphilis deaths during the 1950s, launched the modern sexual era, and not the birth control pill Read More »

Meet Continuum, a pseudoscientific magazine that denied the existence of HIV/AIDS. It ran from 1992 until 2001 and ceased publication because the editors had died of AIDS-defining clinical conditions.

Continuum (magazine) Continuum was a magazine published by an activist group of the same name who denied the existence of HIV/AIDS. Favoring pseudoscientific content, the magazine addressed issues related to HIV/AIDS, AIDS denialism, alternative medicine, and themes of interest to the LGBT community. It ran from December 1992 until February 2001 and ceased publication because …

Meet Continuum, a pseudoscientific magazine that denied the existence of HIV/AIDS. It ran from 1992 until 2001 and ceased publication because the editors had died of AIDS-defining clinical conditions. Read More »