Inca Empire

The Inca did not have a written language but they did store and transfer information via a system of knots in rope that is still being decoded

Harvard undergrad cracks code of knotted Inca rope used as ‘an ancient Excel spreadsheet’ Read Story Transcript Instead of partying during his spring break, Harvard undergrad Manny Medrano stayed on campus and deciphered the meaning of an ancient Inca khipu. Khipus are knotted string devices used by the Inca people to record information like censuses …

The Inca did not have a written language but they did store and transfer information via a system of knots in rope that is still being decoded Read More »

The spaniards destroyed an Inca temple and built a cathedral on the temples foundations. Later, an earthquake completely destroyed the Spanish-made cathedral but left the foundations of the temple intact.

Coricancha, the Incas’ temple of the sun: a history of cities in 50 buildings, day 3 The thin air and harsh, rocky slopes of the Peruvian Andes wouldn’t seem to be a likely locale for the capital of an extensive pre-Columbus empire. Any community seeking to thrive under these conditions would need to be equipped …

The spaniards destroyed an Inca temple and built a cathedral on the temples foundations. Later, an earthquake completely destroyed the Spanish-made cathedral but left the foundations of the temple intact. Read More »

The ‘ancient city of Machu Picchu’ is only 550 years old. The Tower of London predates it by almost 400 years.

Machu Picchu Machu Picchu is a 15th-century Inca citadel, located in the Eastern Cordillera of southern Peru, on a 2,430-metre (7,970 ft) mountain ridge. It is located in the Machupicchu District within Urubamba Province above the Sacred Valley, which is 80 kilometres (50 mi) northwest of Cuzco. The Urubamba River flows past it, cutting through …

The ‘ancient city of Machu Picchu’ is only 550 years old. The Tower of London predates it by almost 400 years. Read More »

The Inka never developed writing but instead had a system of tying knots called khipu in which the color, direction and structure of the knots communicated different information. While most of it is numerical, fully cracking the code reveal a phonetic khipu alphabet with records of history.

The Inka Empire Recorded Their World In Knotted Cords Called Khipu Planet Earth The great South American civilization used complex knots and fibers for record-keeping and communication. More than 400 pendants hang from the primary cord of a khipu, an example of the complex record-keeping system used throughout the Inka Empire and beyond, even well …

The Inka never developed writing but instead had a system of tying knots called khipu in which the color, direction and structure of the knots communicated different information. While most of it is numerical, fully cracking the code reveal a phonetic khipu alphabet with records of history. Read More »