Hermann Göring’s brother strongly opposed the Nazi party, and forged his brother’s signature so people could leave the country. Once, he joined Jews who had to scrub the streets, so the SS officer stopped the activity in order not to humiliate Hermann Göring.

Albert Göring

Albert Günther Göring (9 March 1895 – 20 December 1966) was a German engineer and businessman and the younger brother of Hermann Göring (the head of the German Luftwaffe and a leading member of the Nazi Party). In contrast to his brother, Albert was opposed to Nazism, and he helped Jews and others who were persecuted in Nazi Germany. He was shunned in post-war Germany because of his family name, and he died without any public recognition for his humanitarian efforts.

Family background

Albert Göring was born on 9 March 1895 in the Berlin suburb of Friedenau. He was the fifth child of the former Reichskommissar to German South-West Africa and German Consul General to Haiti, Heinrich Ernst Göring, and his wife Franziska “Fanny” Tiefenb… Continue Reading (6 minute read)

7 thoughts on “Hermann Göring’s brother strongly opposed the Nazi party, and forged his brother’s signature so people could leave the country. Once, he joined Jews who had to scrub the streets, so the SS officer stopped the activity in order not to humiliate Hermann Göring.”

  1. unclehelpful

    He was also shunned after the war because of his last name. Pretty cool story in any case.

  2. labadee

    > In his last years, Göring lived on a pension from the government. He knew that if he married, on his death the pension payments would be transferred to his wife. As a sign of gratitude, he married his housekeeper in 1966 so she would receive his pension. One week later, Albert Göring died without his wartime anti-Nazi activities having been publicly acknowledged

  3. kuntfuxxor

    I remember reading about some of the kids of the nazi leaders and apparently a fair few actually refused to reproduce after the war to end the family line, even getting surgery to prevent it. I felt nothing but pity and sorrow for them, thats a sucky thing to have hanging over you.

  4. Hellrazed

    Yet another military history fact my husband knew. Twenty years and I can’t tell him one he didn’t already know. Upvote for you sir

  5. Swede_as_hell

    Watching Hitlers circle of evil on Netflix. Not the best documentary ever made but gave me at least some new input on the inner circle of the Nazi party.

    Göring does not come a cross as a big ideologist pursuing the ”jewish problem” at all cost (like Himmler or Goebbles) but he is by no means a good guy. Good to learn that at least someone in his family had morals and dignity.

  6. gentlybeepingheart

    > On many occasions, he forged his brother’s signature on transit documents to enable dissidents to escape. When he was caught, he used his brother’s influence to gain his release. Göring also sent trucks to Nazi concentration camps with requests for labourers. The trucks would stop in an isolated area, and their passengers were then allowed to escape.

    The absolute balls on that guy.

  7. Dhoy1

    Taking what I thought was an interesting section from the page:

    >Albert Göring was born on 9 March 1895 in the Berlin suburb of Friedenau. He was the fifth child of…Heinrich Ernst Göring, and his wife Franziska “Fanny” Tiefenbrunn…
    >
    >The Göring family lived with their children’s aristocratic godfather of Jewish heritage, Ritter [Hermann von Epenstein](https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Hermann_von_Epenstein&action=edit&redlink=1), in his Veldenstein and Mauterndorf castles. Von Epenstein was a prominent physician and acted as a surrogate father to the children as Heinrich Göring was often absent from the family home…
    >
    >Von Epenstein began an affair with Franziska Göring about a year before Albert’s birth. A strong physical resemblance between von Epenstein and Albert Göring even led many to believe that they were father and son. If this were true, it meant that Albert Göring was half-Jewish. However, Franziska Göring had accompanied her husband to his post in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, and lived there with him between March 1893 and mid-1894, which makes this seem extremely unlikely.

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