Meet Nyarri Morgan, an Australian aboriginal man who had no contact with the Western world until he witnessed – with no context – an atomic test and its resulting effects

Aboriginal man’s story of Maralinga nuclear bomb survival told with virtual reality

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In an unlikely collision of cultures, state-of-the-art 3D film technology is bringing an Aboriginal man’s unique tale of nuclear bomb survival to audiences across Australia.

In the 1950s Nyarri Morgan was a young man, walking and hunting in South Australia’s northern deserts.

His dramatic first contact with whites came when he witnessed a nuclear bomb explosion at the British testing site at Maralinga.

Now, as an old man, and with the help of director Lynette Wallworth and some technology, he is sharing his story in a film called Collisions that is screening in selected venues around Australia… Continue Reading (3 minute read)

8 thoughts on “Meet Nyarri Morgan, an Australian aboriginal man who had no contact with the Western world until he witnessed – with no context – an atomic test and its resulting effects”

  1. Gemmabeta

    You can make a religion out of this.

    > “[He said] ‘then we saw the spirit had made all the kangaroos fall down on the ground as a gift to us of easy hunting, so we took those kangaroos and we ate them and people were sick and then the spirit left’.”

    > “Powder, white powder killed a lot of kangaroos [and] spinifex [grass]. Water was on fire, that’s what we saw.”

    > “The smoke went into our noses, and other people still have that poison today,” he said. “We all poisoned, in the heart, in the blood and other people that were much closer they didn’t live very long, they died, a whole lot of them.”

  2. Wibbles20

    There’s a tribe in the Alice Springs area that believed bad spirits inhabited a stream and drew cave art of what would happen if they drank from the water.

    Turns out, what they drew thousands of years ago was all the symptoms of radiation poisoning and the area was found to be high in uranium

  3. Stubbly_Poonjab

    “water was on fire” jesus

  4. ShowerSuspicious

    There’s a cool documentary on prime amazon about a group of aboriginal people meeting Europeans for the first time in 1964.

    Contact is a 2009 Australian documentary film that tells the story of 20 Martu people who in 1964 became the last people in the Great Sandy Desert to have come into contact with Europeans.

  5. supagirl277

    Damn. An atomic test with casualties like that just isn’t a test anymore

  6. TiG82

    The VR work by Lynette Wallworth is called COLLISIONS. I highly recommend seeing it if you get the opportunity

  7. MandrakeThePancake

    Disgusting tests. Apart from testing nukes in an area holy to the aboriginal people, they also ordered soldiers to pass through those areas right after the tests, resulting in massive cancer-spikes among those veterans due to radiation.

    They knew something was up with radioactive fallout and still used people as guinea pigs.

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