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Infectious Diseases

You were more likely to get a job if you had smallpox scars in the 18th century. The scars proved that you already had smallpox and could not pass it on to your employers.

Series H – Horrible Preview clip Further details Topics – The panel are shown a creature and are asked where it lives. It lives on the tongue of a fish. The tongue-eating louse lives on the tongue of the African blacktail fish. It latches onto the tongue, sucks the blood out to such an extent …

You were more likely to get a job if you had smallpox scars in the 18th century. The scars proved that you already had smallpox and could not pass it on to your employers. Read More »

Meet Continuum, a magazine devoted to proving HIV/AIDS is hoax. It ceased publishing after all of its core members died of HIV complications.

Continuum (magazine) Continuum was a magazine published by an activist group of the same name who denied the existence of HIV/AIDS. Favoring pseudoscientific content, the magazine addressed issues related to HIV/AIDS, AIDS denialism, alternative medicine, and themes of interest to the LGBT community. It ran from December 1992 until February 2001 and ceased publication because …

Meet Continuum, a magazine devoted to proving HIV/AIDS is hoax. It ceased publishing after all of its core members died of HIV complications. Read More »

In 1985, Wong-Staal became the first person to clone HIV and to generate a genetic mapping of the virus which would be used for the research and design of treatments for AIDS.

Flossie Wong-Staal KEYWORDS: Yee Ching Wong, Flossie Wong-Staal, AIDS, HIV SHE THOUGHT IT Flossie Wong-Staal is a Chinese-American scientist who holds a bachelor’s degree in Bacteriology (1968) and a PhD in Molecular Biology (1972) both from the University of California in Los Angeles. Her professional career in a laboratory started in the early 1970s when …

In 1985, Wong-Staal became the first person to clone HIV and to generate a genetic mapping of the virus which would be used for the research and design of treatments for AIDS. Read More »

Meet Continuum, a pseudoscientific magazine that denied the existence of HIV/AIDS. It ran from 1992 until 2001 and ceased publication because the editors had died of AIDS-defining clinical conditions.

Continuum (magazine) Continuum was a magazine published by an activist group of the same name who denied the existence of HIV/AIDS. Favoring pseudoscientific content, the magazine addressed issues related to HIV/AIDS, AIDS denialism, alternative medicine, and themes of interest to the LGBT community. It ran from December 1992 until February 2001 and ceased publication because …

Meet Continuum, a pseudoscientific magazine that denied the existence of HIV/AIDS. It ran from 1992 until 2001 and ceased publication because the editors had died of AIDS-defining clinical conditions. Read More »

Syphilis had many historical names. In Germany it was The French Disease. In France it was The Italian Disease. In Holland it was The Spanish Disease. In Russia it was The Polish Disease. The Turks called it The Christian Disease.

History of syphilis The name “syphilis” was coined by the Italian physician and poet Girolamo Fracastoro in his pastoral noted poem, written in Latin, titled Syphilis sive morbus gallicus (Latin for “Syphilis or The French Disease”) in 1530. The protagonist of the poem is a shepherd named Syphilus (perhaps a variant spelling of Sipylus, a …

Syphilis had many historical names. In Germany it was The French Disease. In France it was The Italian Disease. In Holland it was The Spanish Disease. In Russia it was The Polish Disease. The Turks called it The Christian Disease. Read More »

Dr. Carlo Urbani recognized the emergence of a outbreak of pneumonia as a new epidemic and immediately notified the WHO, personally flying to Hanoi to investigate. He would die this day in 2003 of SARS, having triggered the most effective response to an epidemic in history.

Carlo Urbani Carlo Urbani (Italian pronunciation: [ˈkarlo urˈbaːni]; Castelplanio, Italy October 19, 1956 – Bangkok, Thailand March 29, 2003) was an Italian doctor and microbiologist and the first to identify severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) as a new and dangerously contagious viral disease. Although he became infected and died, his early warning to the World …

Dr. Carlo Urbani recognized the emergence of a outbreak of pneumonia as a new epidemic and immediately notified the WHO, personally flying to Hanoi to investigate. He would die this day in 2003 of SARS, having triggered the most effective response to an epidemic in history. Read More »

In 36 BCE, Roman statesman Marcus Varro wrote about germs, describing “minute creatures which cannot be seen by the eyes, which…enter the body through the mouth and nose and there cause serious diseases.” The germ theory of disease would not be accepted widely for another 1,900 years.

The germ theory of disease is the currently accepted scientific theory of disease. It states that many diseases are caused by microorganisms. “Germ” may refer to not just a bacterium but to any type of microorganism or even non-living pathogen that can cause disease, such as protists, fungi, viruses, prions, or viroids.[1] Microorganisms that cause …

In 36 BCE, Roman statesman Marcus Varro wrote about germs, describing “minute creatures which cannot be seen by the eyes, which…enter the body through the mouth and nose and there cause serious diseases.” The germ theory of disease would not be accepted widely for another 1,900 years. Read More »