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Why Did the Passenger Pigeon Go Extinct?

The Passenger Pigeon, more commonly known as the wild pigeon, is an extinct species of pigeon that used to be endemic to North America. But did you ever wonder why they no longer exist? The Passenger Pigeon used to be the most abundant bird on the planet. But due to commercial exploitation of pigeon meat …

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Are Parakeets Considered as an Invasive Species to Europe?

Parakeets are small to medium-sized parrots that generally have long tail feathers. Some included in the genera are the budgerigars, monk parakeets, and plain parakeets. While they are abundant in South Asia, Australia, and the Pacific Islands, they are not as common in Europe. So how did this species spread so rapidly in Europe? In …

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Did People Really Put Live Birds in a Pie?

During banquets starting from the Middle Ages, many royals and upper-class individuals used animated pies as entertainment. In these animated pies were living rabbits, frogs, turtles, birds, and other small animals that would escape the pie’s encasing to the guests’ amusement.  In a well-recognized English nursery rhyme entitled Sing a Song of Sixpence, the song …

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Researchers taught African grey parrots to buy food using tokens. They were then paired up, one parrot given ten tokens and the other none. Without any incentive for sharing, parrots with tokens started to give some to their broke partners so that everyone could eat.

Parrots Will Share Currency to Help Their Pals Purchase Food Parrots go bonkers for walnuts. After snatching the seeds, these brightly plumed birds crack into them with glee. When offered the nuts as a prize, parrots will do tricks, solve puzzles and learn complex tasks. They’ll even trade currency for them in the form of …

Researchers taught African grey parrots to buy food using tokens. They were then paired up, one parrot given ten tokens and the other none. Without any incentive for sharing, parrots with tokens started to give some to their broke partners so that everyone could eat. Read More »

An Australian bird, called the rainbow lorikeet, routinely gets drunk from spring to summer. The small birds drink the fermented crimson flower nectar from the Weeping Boer-bean tree. When intoxicated these birds make loud drunken noises which many people find bothersome.

Aussie Bird Likes to Get drunk You can hardly go anywhere in Australia without hearing the familiar shrieking of the rainbow lorikeet. Beautiful to look at with their array of colourful feathers but extremely hard on the ears, the rainbow lorikeet can sometimes be considered a pest. The rainbow lorikeet is perhaps one of the …

An Australian bird, called the rainbow lorikeet, routinely gets drunk from spring to summer. The small birds drink the fermented crimson flower nectar from the Weeping Boer-bean tree. When intoxicated these birds make loud drunken noises which many people find bothersome. Read More »