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How Did Evolution Bring Back a Flightless Bird from Extinction?

There are so many reasons why extinction occurs. This could be caused by natural disasters, evolutionary changes, or even overexploitation. But there are instances when certain species seemingly come back.  The Aldabra rail, a flightless bird, was wiped out along with all the terrestrial animals that once lived on Aldabra. A massive flood sank a …

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The 2011 earthquake off the coast of Japan was so powerful – measuring almost 9.0 on the Richter scale – it moved Japan 8 feet closer to North America and shifted the planet on its axis, causing the length of a day to shorten by almost 1.8 microseconds

Quake moved Japan coast 8 feet, shifted Earth’s axis (CNN) — The powerful earthquake that unleashed a devastating tsunami Friday appears to have moved the main island of Japan by 8 feet (2.4 meters) and shifted the Earth on its axis. “At this point, we know that one GPS station moved (8 feet), and we …

The 2011 earthquake off the coast of Japan was so powerful – measuring almost 9.0 on the Richter scale – it moved Japan 8 feet closer to North America and shifted the planet on its axis, causing the length of a day to shorten by almost 1.8 microseconds Read More »

Neanderthals, which were traditionally thought of as extremely primitive humans, are now believed to have been extremely intelligent, even comparable to the intelligence of modern humans. They used tools, had social structures, thrived in hostile environments, and lived long lives.

Rethinking Neanderthals Bruno Maureille unlocks the gate in a chain-link fence, and we walk into the fossil bed past a pile of limestone rubble, the detritus of an earlier dig. We’re 280 miles southwest of Paris, in rolling farm country dotted with long-haired cattle and etched by meandering streams. Maureille, an anthropologist at the University …

Neanderthals, which were traditionally thought of as extremely primitive humans, are now believed to have been extremely intelligent, even comparable to the intelligence of modern humans. They used tools, had social structures, thrived in hostile environments, and lived long lives. Read More »

Aroundf 2.1 billion years ago, there existeed several multicellular organisms, that were likely one of the first forays into multicellularity, they coincided with a brief moment of increased oxygen levels and went extinct after the levels dropped, they do not have any modern-day descendants.

Francevillian biota Francevillian biota fossils The Francevillian biota (also known as Gabon macrofossils or Gabonionta) is a group of 2.1-billion-year-old Palaeoproterozoic, macroscopic organisms known from fossils found in Gabon in the Palaeoproterozoic Francevillian B Formation, a black shale province. The fossils are regarded as evidence of the earliest form of multicellular life. The fossils were …

Aroundf 2.1 billion years ago, there existeed several multicellular organisms, that were likely one of the first forays into multicellularity, they coincided with a brief moment of increased oxygen levels and went extinct after the levels dropped, they do not have any modern-day descendants. Read More »

The Scottish Highlands and the Appalachians are the same mountain range, once connected as the Central Pangean Mountains.

Central Pangean Mountains Map of Pangaea, including the Central Pangean Mountains. The Central Pangean Mountains were an extensive northeast-southwest trending mountain range in the central portion of the supercontinent Pangaea during the Carboniferous, Permian and Triassic periods. They were formed as a result of collision between the minor supercontinents Laurussia and Gondwana during the formation …

The Scottish Highlands and the Appalachians are the same mountain range, once connected as the Central Pangean Mountains. Read More »

The idea of black holes was first proposed in 1783 by John Michell, calling them “dark stars” and proposing a method to detect them by looking for star systems that showed the gravitational effects of two stars, but only one star was visible, which is indeed how scientists look for them today

The forgotten genius who discovered black holes over 200 years ago Centuries before black holes became accepted science, a fat little man in 1780s Yorkshire imagined stars so massive that even light could not escape. He predicted black holes. This is the incredible story of John Michell and his “dark stars.” The Fat Little Country …

The idea of black holes was first proposed in 1783 by John Michell, calling them “dark stars” and proposing a method to detect them by looking for star systems that showed the gravitational effects of two stars, but only one star was visible, which is indeed how scientists look for them today Read More »

Dubai creates artificial rain regularly using cloud seeding, as natural rain is very rare. People are informed about the rains a day in advance.

Over 200 cloud seeding missions conducted in UAE from January to June this year Abu Dhabi: A total of 219 cloud seeding operations across the UAE were conducted in the first six months of the year to enhance the country’s water supply, the National Centre of Meteorology (NCM) revealed on Monday. From January to June, …

Dubai creates artificial rain regularly using cloud seeding, as natural rain is very rare. People are informed about the rains a day in advance. Read More »

A field of seagrass converts carbon dioxide to oxygen at over 8x the rate of a forest the same size.

Underwater Meadows of Seagrass Could Be the Ideal Carbon Sinks According to the UN’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, urgent and unprecedented changes are needed to avoid a climate change catastrophe. Although efforts are already being made to reduce the production of greenhouse gasses, they are by most estimations not enough. It is therefore critical …

A field of seagrass converts carbon dioxide to oxygen at over 8x the rate of a forest the same size. Read More »