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Biological Sciences

How Important are Phytoplankton and Seaweed in Our Ecosystem?

Growing up, we learned that oxygen comes from trees and other organisms that produce food through the process of photosynthesis. But do you know how important marine photosythesizers are? According to research, more than half of the amount of oxygen humans breath actually come from the ocean. This is thanks to our marine photosynthesizers that …

How Important are Phytoplankton and Seaweed in Our Ecosystem? Read More »

Why Do Fruit Flies Drink?

Yes, you read the title right. Fruit flies drink. Researchers have discovered that the common fruit fly actually prefer to feed on substances that have about 4 to 5 percent of alcohol. Fruit flies like to self-medicate just as humans do. They rid their frustrations through the consumption of alcohol. Male flies prefer spiked food …

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Some ant queens will find a queen with an established nest to kill and impersonate. To sneak into the nest they first find and kill a worker ant for its scent.

Lasius umbratus Lasius umbratus, colloquially known as the yellow shadow ant and yellow lawn ant, is a palearctic species of parasitic ant distributed across Eurasia and the Maghreb region of Africa. It was once thought that this species occurred in North America as well, but comparative genomic studies indicate the Afro-Eurasian and American populations are …

Some ant queens will find a queen with an established nest to kill and impersonate. To sneak into the nest they first find and kill a worker ant for its scent. Read More »

Meet Kauaʻi ʻōʻō, a now-extinct species of bird, endemic to the island of Kaua’i in Hawaii. The last individual ever was a male, and he was recorded singing a mating call, to a female that would never come. He died in 1987.

Kauaʻi ʻōʻō The Kauaʻi ʻōʻō or ʻōʻōʻāʻā (Moho braccatus) was a member of the extinct genus of the ʻōʻōs (Moho) within the extinct family Mohoidae from the islands of Hawai’i. It was previously regarded as member of the Australo-Pacific honeyeaters (family Meliphagidae). This bird was endemic to the island of Kauaʻi. It was common in …

Meet Kauaʻi ʻōʻō, a now-extinct species of bird, endemic to the island of Kaua’i in Hawaii. The last individual ever was a male, and he was recorded singing a mating call, to a female that would never come. He died in 1987. Read More »

Evidence suggests that sloths grow algae in their fur and then eat it. This algae-farming is thought to be aided by moths that live in the fur, and whose growth the sloth actively promotes.

The Strange Symbiosis Between Sloths and Moths Once a week, three-toed sloths slowly descend from the leafy forest canopy to poop on the ground. Why do these sluggish mammals go on such a long and potentially dangerous journey instead of just letting it fly from the treetops? Scientists now believe the answer has to do …

Evidence suggests that sloths grow algae in their fur and then eat it. This algae-farming is thought to be aided by moths that live in the fur, and whose growth the sloth actively promotes. Read More »

Aroundf 2.1 billion years ago, there existeed several multicellular organisms, that were likely one of the first forays into multicellularity, they coincided with a brief moment of increased oxygen levels and went extinct after the levels dropped, they do not have any modern-day descendants.

Francevillian biota Francevillian biota fossils The Francevillian biota (also known as Gabon macrofossils or Gabonionta) is a group of 2.1-billion-year-old Palaeoproterozoic, macroscopic organisms known from fossils found in Gabon in the Palaeoproterozoic Francevillian B Formation, a black shale province. The fossils are regarded as evidence of the earliest form of multicellular life. The fossils were …

Aroundf 2.1 billion years ago, there existeed several multicellular organisms, that were likely one of the first forays into multicellularity, they coincided with a brief moment of increased oxygen levels and went extinct after the levels dropped, they do not have any modern-day descendants. Read More »

Ninjas would carry crickets or cicadas to disguise their sound when they needed.

7 Things you didn’t know about Ninja Imposing figures in black, hiding in the shadows, and moving about with almost superhuman agility seem like nothing but cool stories told to tourists and movie-goers nowadays, but were once a very real part of feudal Japan. Japanese folklore states that the Ninja descended from a demon that …

Ninjas would carry crickets or cicadas to disguise their sound when they needed. Read More »

Five completely separate groups of crustaceans independently evolved into what we commonly refer to as “crabs.” This phenomenon is called “carcinization.”

Evolution of crabs – history and deconstruction of a prime example of convergence Compared with the elongate bodies of shrimps or lobsters, crabs are characterised by a compact body organisation with a depressed, short carapace and a ventrally folded pleon. The evolutionary transformation from a lobster-like crustacean towards a crab is called ‘carcinization’ and has …

Five completely separate groups of crustaceans independently evolved into what we commonly refer to as “crabs.” This phenomenon is called “carcinization.” Read More »