Meet Hans Münch, a doctor known as The Good Man of Auschwitz because he refused to assist in the atrocities. His experiments were elaborate farces intended to protect inmates. He was the only person acquitted of crimes at the 1947 Auschwitz trials after many inmates testified in his favour.

Hans Münch

In June 1943, he was recruited as a scientist by the Waffen-SS and was sent to the Hygiene Institute of the Waffen-SS [de] in Raisko, about 4 km (2.5 mi) from the main camp at Auschwitz. Münch worked alongside the infamous Josef Mengele, who was the same age and also came from Bavaria. Münch continued the bacteriological research he was known for before the war, as well as making occasional inspections of the camps and the prisoners.

Along with other doctors, Münch was expected to participate in the “selections” at the camp of Auschwitz-Birkenau, to decide who among the incoming Jewish men, women and children could work, who would be experimented on, and who would be put to death in the gas chambers. He found this abhorrent and ref… Continue Reading (9 minute read)

6 thoughts on “Meet Hans Münch, a doctor known as The Good Man of Auschwitz because he refused to assist in the atrocities. His experiments were elaborate farces intended to protect inmates. He was the only person acquitted of crimes at the 1947 Auschwitz trials after many inmates testified in his favour.”

  1. superanth

    “And for this experiment we provide the test subject with beer until he starts giggling…”

  2. ididitforcheese

    I wonder what his experiments were…

  3. FantasticWittyRetort

    I love the quote where he spoke about Holocaust denial.

    “When someone says that Auschwitz is a lie, that it is a hoax, I feel hesitation to say much to him. I say, the facts are so firmly determined, that one cannot have any doubt at all, and I stop talking to that person because there is no use. One knows that anyone who clings to such things, which are published somewhere, is a malevolent person who has some personal interest to want to bury in silence things that cannot be buried in silence.”

    That seems so applicable to topics and people today!

  4. heathers1

    It’s that resistance on a personal level that is so important. Like, you may not be able to fix everything, but you can do this\_\_\_\_\_\_\_\_\_\_\_\_. Imagine if everyone had done just that. Millions of lives could have been saved.

  5. OldWhoFan

    Damn reading about him later in life. He testified against his fellow fromer nazi’s at the 1964 Auschwitz Trial in Frankfurt and then worked to stop holocaust denial. THEN when was absolutely in the middle of losing his mind from Alzheimer’s disease, but He keep doing interviews and keep getting charged when it was broadcast. I’m sure if he was still alive someone would be attempting to drag him back to court for something.

  6. notes-on-a-wall

    What’s amazing to me, is it’s easy to think the Holocaust happened a long long time ago, but Dr. Münch passed away only in 2001, at age 90.

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